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View Full Version : MVN:NFL Draft: Production Vs. Measurables


Wolf
01-17-2008, 02:48 PM
We constantly see productive college players from big time schools, who have won multiple awards and have been named to All-American Teams slide in the draft because of a poor combine. DeMeco Ryans was an All-American at Alabama and the SEC Defensive Player of the Year in 2005. He fell into the second round of the 2006 NFL Draft after running a slower time at the NFL combine, but went on to win the 2006 Defensive Rookie of the Year with the Houston Texans. There are countless other examples of this.

I personally feel that NFL teams put much too much emphasis on the NFL combine, especially the 40-yard dash. How often does an NFL player run straight ahead 40-yards in a full sprint? How much of a difference can it really make on the field if a corner runs a 4.33 instead of a 4.46? We are talking about tenths of a second here.

I have always been a fan of drafting a player that produced at a big name school in a major conference in the NFL draft, especially in the early rounds. These players understand playing on a big stage and have faced the top competition in the country. If a player produced in the ACC, Big 12, Big 10, SEC or Pac 10, I feel there is a greater chance they will develop into a productive NFL player. Games are won on the field, not in the weight room or on the track, and I would rather have a player on my team that has proved themselves against top flight competition than a workout warrior any day.

Obviously, drafting a player that has big game experience on the college level and tests well at the combine is ideal. That is not what this post is about and I know if I didnít mention it, it would be brought up in the comments section.

What do Giants fans think? Should a GM select a player who has more strength and speed but has not been very productive during their college career over a player that does not stand out at the NFL combine but has produced on the field at the college level?

http://mvn.com/nfl-giants/2008/01/16/nfl-draft-production-vs-measurables/

threetoedpete
01-17-2008, 03:00 PM
I personally feel that NFL teams put much too much emphasis on the NFL combine, especially the 40-yard dash. How often does an NFL player run straight ahead 40-yards in a full sprint? How much of a difference can it really make on the field if a corner runs a 4.33 instead of a 4.46? We are talking about tenths of a second here.

We humbly disgree: Signed Mario Willams, Devon Heter, Lafou Tatupu, Antonio Cromartie, Jason Peters, Logan Matkins, Tony Ugoh.

We are talking Athletism here. You can't buy it, wish it or pray for it. You either got it or you don't. And I guess this means that Petey Faggin is comprable to Antonio Cromartie ? Which one do you want starting for your football team @ Cb ?

Mindless off season blige. Wasted band wideth.

kastofsna
01-17-2008, 03:37 PM
athleticism is #1. period. for every DeMeco Ryans (guys who were All-Americans and all-conference and fell a bit in the draft), there are guys who were All-Americans and did NOTHING in the NFL.

tulexan
01-17-2008, 03:49 PM
For running backs, a 4.33 and 4.46 is very different. Holes don't stay open for very long and those extra .13 seconds could be the difference between making it through and a shoe string tackle.

Specnatz
01-17-2008, 05:15 PM
For running backs, a 4.33 and 4.46 is very different. Holes don't stay open for very long and those extra .13 seconds could be the difference between making it through and a shoe string tackle.

Yeah but then you have guys that can run a very fast 40 but do not have that intial busrt to get to the hole as quickly as someone with a slower 40 time.

kastofsna
01-17-2008, 05:29 PM
that's why there are all kinds of speed tests at the combine, not just the 40, which everyone who's not a scout only focuses on.

TexansSeminole
01-17-2008, 06:38 PM
that's why there are all kinds of speed tests at the combine, not just the 40, which everyone who's not a scout only focuses on.

Truth.

You shouldn't put all your evaluation of a player on his combine workout, but the numbers at the combine are a good way to compare players in different aspects of athleticism.