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NitroGSXR
08-05-2007, 06:40 PM
Notable Rule Changes For 2007
August 4, 2007 | Last Updated: 8/4/07 1:51 PM ET | Comments (0)
By: CHRIS McPHERSON

NFL official Tom Sifferman hosted a roundtable discussion for the media on Saturday to discuss the rule changes for 2007. Sifferman, Chad Brown, Scott Helverson and Tom Symonette have been at the Eagles' training camp to advise the players on the new rules during practices.

The most notable changes include:

1/ Spiking or throwing the ball in the field of play after a down has ended results in a five-yard penalty. Players can still spike the ball after touchdowns. If a player spikes the ball while the play is still alive, it will be deemed an illegal forward pass if the ball moves forward. If the ball moves back, the result is a fumble and the play is still alive. The reason for this rule change is to improve sportsmanship and to speed up the game.

2.In previous years, when an airborne player was headed out of bounds near the goal line he would score as long as the ball broke the plane in or out of bounds because, in theory, the goal line extended beyond the field of play. That is the case no more. The player now must get any part of the football to pass over or inside the goal line pylon before he touches out of bounds to be awarded a touchdown.
The NFL invested a significant amount of money in the off-season to upgrade instant replay technology to high definition because it is now a permanent part of the game. To help speed up the game, referees will now only have 60 seconds instead of 90 to review a play.

3. Another significant change to instant replay is that plays where runners are ruled down by contact, but a fumble occurs can now be challenged. If there is indisputable evidence of a fumble, the spot where the player recovered the ball will be the new line of scrimmage. Any advances are nullified. If there is no indisputable visual evidence, the original call of down by contact will stand.
Illegal touching was called on offensive linemen if they were the first to touch a forward pass. Now, it is only illegal if they intentionally try to touch it or if the pass is caught by a player who was originally ineligible before the snap. It was deemed that no advantage was gained when an offensive lineman unintentionally touched a forward pass.

4. An illegal cut block on wide receiver - any block below the waist after the receiver crosses the line of scrimmage - is now a 15-yard penalty and an automatic first down.

Other points of emphasis include:

--Referees will be very strict in calling illegal contact, defensive holding, taunting and roughing the quarterback penalties.

-- The amount of time for teams to prepare the kicking (or K) balls has been extended to 45 minutes from 20, beginning two hours and 15 minutes prior to kickoff. The officials will assign an independent K-ball person to relay the 12 balls into play when needed. Every effort will be made to keep a ball in play that has previously been kicked.


http://www.philadelphiaeagles.com/news/Sto...?story_id=13448 (http://www.philadelphiaeagles.com/news/Story.asp?story_id=13448)
These changes are pretty significant but I really have to agree with all of these.

Especially 3A (challenge of downs by contact) and 3B (No penalty when an offensive lineman touches the ball first)(David Carr probably could have benefited from this rule somewhat as well as QBs who have a sidearm delivery). I do NOT like unchallengable plays one iota and this just changes a lot. With the new quality of Instant replay interwined with the new 60 second rule. There should be NOT BE A SINGLE PLAY that is unchallengable. Of course, I was happy with the 90 second rule but it shouldn't make all that much of a difference when you factor in the higher quality being implemented.

I really like what the NFL has done here. To quote a buddy of mine, "Fine-tuning the greatest sport in the galaxy."

Let's hear your thoughts on these rule changes, fellows!

Double Barrel
08-05-2007, 06:59 PM
No. 2 is epic. I never agreed with the infinite goal line logic, and I am glad to hear it addressed. This is a great decision, IMO.

--Referees will be very strict in calling illegal contact, defensive holding, taunting and roughing the quarterback penalties.

The NFL is promoting offense. Tightening these rules will both help and hinder us, depending on which side of the ball we're on. Richard Smith likes an agressive style of defense, and he takes risks. Hopefully they are smart risks and he stresses discipline and self-control from our defenders. But I think our new offense will benefit from the tightening and could help jump start the process they're trying to build.

NitroGSXR
08-05-2007, 07:06 PM
The NFL is promoting offense. Tightening these rules will both help and hinder us, depending on which side of the ball we're on. Richard Smith likes an agressive style of defense, and he takes risks. Hopefully they are smart risks and he stresses discipline and self-control from our defenders. But I think our new offense will benefit from the tightening and could help jump start the process they're trying to build.
I do have a slight concern with this one though. Just how much is too much? Does this 'guideline' for the referees give them too much leeway? I thought that the NFL has pretty much done a good job on calling the roughing penalties in general. David Stern hindered the flow of the way basketball is played nowadays. He became so much stricter that teams just insanely increased their scoring outputs this season. I rather enjoyed seeing basketball players playing defense just as much as I enjoyed seeing them score. With them stressing for stricter calls in the NFL just gives me a little bit of concern. Remember, this is not one of the rule changes. It's just a very general remark in the rule book that just may give too much leeway to the referees.

TexanSam
08-05-2007, 07:36 PM
To help speed up the game, referees will now only have 60 seconds instead of 90 to review a play.

Because the referees always obey that time limit right?

Double Barrel
08-06-2007, 10:57 AM
I do have a slight concern with this one though. Just how much is too much? Does this 'guideline' for the referees give them too much leeway? I thought that the NFL has pretty much done a good job on calling the roughing penalties in general. David Stern hindered the flow of the way basketball is played nowadays. He became so much stricter that teams just insanely increased their scoring outputs this season. I rather enjoyed seeing basketball players playing defense just as much as I enjoyed seeing them score. With them stressing for stricter calls in the NFL just gives me a little bit of concern. Remember, this is not one of the rule changes. It's just a very general remark in the rule book that just may give too much leeway to the referees.

I agree with you. I understand that teams want to protect their big investments, but QBs are still football players. They are going to get hit, and referees are given a lot of power with the leeway to decide these new changes.

Overalls
08-06-2007, 01:08 PM
Tell me if I am misinterpreting this or not.

1/ Spiking or throwing the ball in the field of play after a down has ended results in a five-yard penalty. Players can still spike the ball after touchdowns. If a player spikes the ball while the play is still alive, it will be deemed an illegal forward pass if the ball moves forward. If the ball moves back, the result is a fumble and the play is still alive. The reason for this rule change is to improve sportsmanship and to speed up the game.

Does this mean that a team can no longer spike the ball to keep from using a timeout. If so, I don't like it.

Specnatz
08-06-2007, 03:38 PM
Tell me if I am misinterpreting this or not.



Does this mean that a team can no longer spike the ball to keep from using a timeout. If so, I don't like it.

No I think it is only in referance to the unsportsman crap like a TO does, gets a first down and then spikes the ball, because we all know how great getting a first down is and you need as much attention for doing it.

Overalls
08-06-2007, 04:39 PM
Just wondering. It says when the play is still alive. That would be before the whistle blows. In the past that was just an incomplete pass and loss of downs. If they play was alive with TO spiking the ball before scoring it would be a fumble.