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View Full Version : I'm proud of our FO regarding our Texans


gtexan02
02-03-2007, 11:26 AM
It was a sad year for the NFL. 9 Bengal players were arrested, and their star receiver is now being questioned in a homicide case in Miami. An emerging star on the Broncos was shot to death on New Years eve. Players were being suspended for steroids, drugs, and other illegal activities.

I used to hope that the Texans would take a chance on some of the problem kids (Ahmad Brooks, Marcus Vick, etc), but now I'm really glad they didn't.

DarkNinja
02-03-2007, 11:57 AM
The problem is trying to get the O-line likable enough to block for David Carr. Its evident they haven't liked him since the franchise started but they blocked for Sage.....hmm.:secret:

gtexan02
02-03-2007, 12:38 PM
The problem is trying to get the O-line likable enough to block for David Carr. Its evident they haven't liked him since the franchise started but they blocked for Sage.....hmm.:secret:

A new record for thread hijacking. One post turned a completely non-Carr or OL related issue into a Carr vs. Sage debate. Well done...

Ole Miss Texan
02-03-2007, 02:47 PM
The problem is trying to get the O-line likable enough to block for David Carr. Its evident they haven't liked him since the franchise started but they blocked for Sage.....hmm.:secret:

This has absolutely no significance to this thread...there are plenty of carr threads out there.

I like the fact that the texans don't go for 'problem' guys. I see the majority of the players here are very respectful and good guys. A lot have tremendous stories from their past...and have gone through so many hardships to finally playing for the texans. keep up the good work.

I see that with the Astros as well...houston sports teams in general are a lot classier clubs than most of the others...thanks houston.

gtexan02
02-03-2007, 02:54 PM
If anyone happened to read the new commish' statement about NFL players committing crimes, I wouldn't be at all surprised to see the league enforced penalties increrase. If thats the case, it'll be nice knowing we don't have players likely to miss games for non-injury reasons

Texanfan4ever
02-03-2007, 03:29 PM
The problem is trying to get the O-line likable enough to block for David Carr. Its evident they haven't liked him since the franchise started but they blocked for Sage.....hmm.:secret:

Unbelievable thing to say.

I like being able to be proud of all of our players and our coaches because of the kind of people that they are. I talked to Ryan (can't remember his last name) but he is up there and travels with the team. He is a scout and he was telling us that he is in charge, among other things, running extensive background checks on everyone they are interested in. It's the reason we would never take a "disease" like T.O.

I like our class too.

Insideop
02-03-2007, 05:15 PM
I think the class of our Texans is due in large part to our owner, Bob McNair. I really believe, when he started this whole process of getting a NFL team to Houston, he wanted a 1st class organization in every way. And I think the character of the whole organization is a reflection of him. He seems like a classy guy, from what I've seen/read of him. I personally am glad he is willing to sacrifice maybe getting the more talented player in order to get a player of good character. I know that is not a popular view with some, but I feel in the long run it will come back and pay us with interest (as in Super Bowls)! JMHO!

old football fan
02-03-2007, 05:41 PM
The problem is trying to get the O-line likable enough to block for David Carr. Its evident they haven't liked him since the franchise started but they blocked for Sage.....hmm.:secret:

Please bring back the negative rep just this one time.

Navy_Chris
02-03-2007, 05:45 PM
I think the class of our Texans is due in large part to our owner, Bob McNair. I really believe, when he started this whole process of getting a NFL team to Houston, he wanted a 1st class organization in every way. And I think the character of the whole organization is a reflection of him. He seems like a classy guy, from what I've seen/read of him. I personally am glad he is willing to sacrifice maybe getting the more talented player in order to get a player of good character. I know that is not a popular view with some, but I feel in the long run it will come back and pay us with interest (as in Super Bowls)! JMHO!

I understand that Bob McNair wants a classy organization. But I think he's let that sort of get in the way of what his prime objective should be....putting fans in the seats and winning football games. Just because Player A has no off-the field problems doesn't mean we should take him over Player B just because Player B may have a little extra baggage with him. In the past, I think that ideology may have hurt us a little bit. Plus, I think adding someone to this team with a little attitude would actually be a good thing.

thunderkyss
02-03-2007, 06:15 PM
It was a sad year for the NFL. 9 Bengal players were arrested, and their star receiver is now being questioned in a homicide case in Miami. An emerging star on the Broncos was shot to death on New Years eve. Players were being suspended for steroids, drugs, and other illegal activities.

I used to hope that the Texans would take a chance on some of the problem kids (Ahmad Brooks, Marcus Vick, etc), but now I'm really glad they didn't.

I was so ready to give you some rep on this post, but to lump Darrent Williams in that group with those players just turned me off.

HE was just out having New Years fun on New Years Eve...... no wrong doing whatsoever.. Just an unfortunate guy being targeted by idiots.

There is nothing wrong with unwinding, and going to the clubs, many of us do it, many of our players do it..... heck, one of our guys was tased & arrested..... for no good reason.

Ole Miss Texan
02-03-2007, 08:32 PM
I was so ready to give you some rep on this post, but to lump Darrent Williams in that group with those players just turned me off.

HE was just out having New Years fun on New Years Eve...... no wrong doing whatsoever.. Just an unfortunate guy being targeted by idiots.

There is nothing wrong with unwinding, and going to the clubs, many of us do it, many of our players do it..... heck, one of our guys was tased & arrested..... for no good reason.

I gave him rep for this because it's all true. Yea we don't know the extent of everything that happened that fatefull night for williams but the man sadly died. Whether he or any of his entourage did anything to provoke the stupid person that would actually do this is not known at all.

As far as I know, no texan has died. Fred Weary was pulled over and tazered for a minor incident which he is now bringing more public and possibly suing the houston police dept. I think all gtexan was trying to state is that nobody on our team has gotten in that serious of trouble...the one that got a ticket and 'arrested' was completed unwarranted and blown to extremes. I'm thankful no texan has been even unlucky enough to be any an serious danger.

Rep g.

TwinSisters
02-03-2007, 09:11 PM
It was a sad year for the NFL. 9 Bengal players were arrested, and their star receiver is now being questioned in a homicide case in Miami. An emerging star on the Broncos was shot to death on New Years eve. Players were being suspended for steroids, drugs, and other illegal activities.

I used to hope that the Texans would take a chance on some of the problem kids (Ahmad Brooks, Marcus Vick, etc), but now I'm really glad they didn't.

I don't know if I am or not.

One, I don't feel like you should have to prop up a guy for not raping, roidin, stealin, killin', etc.

Two, then if I take that out... I'm left with looking at a bunch of bungeling apes trying to get ants out of a log with a little straw. Fascinating. Really. You know, for a bunch of bungleling apes that is.

let me conjure up what I see when I think of the Texan FO....

Super Bowl Style
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjNJ8XyFCfo
"Uh, Bob... Gary...Rick... just so you know, we are losing."
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4uI7A1CzIs

Ole Miss Texan
02-03-2007, 09:30 PM
yup, some people with bad morals, principles, and attitudes sure do ruin the rest of it for everybody else. some people think they are owed ***** when they went through nothing and don't deserve *****.

Cincinnatikid
02-04-2007, 08:29 AM
I don't know why every one is so hard on the bengals as an organization. All of the players in the nfl are adults and make their own decisions. The coaches can not keep the players from doing things in their free time. And if you read about chad johnson being questioned in the case the police said they interview everyone that had an acquaintance with the murdered guy. Even the kids mom said she had no idea why they were talking to him especially after the police said he was in no way a suspect. The one person the bengals really took a chance on, Ahmad Brooks, has done nothing wrong. Just because you have a hard time early in life or even if you had a great time growing up does not mean you will or will not get in trouble later. The league needs to find ways of helping these younger guys adjust to their new lives with money instead of just picking the bengals and saying they are out of control. This is the same reason why poor kids in poor school districts do not succeed because most people just label them as wastes as soon as they get in trouble one time intheir lives.

ArlingtonTexan
02-04-2007, 08:43 AM
I don't know why every one is so hard on the bengals as an organization. All of the players in the nfl are adults and make their own decisions. The coaches can not keep the players from doing things in their free time. And if you read about chad johnson being questioned in the case the police said they interview everyone that had an acquaintance with the murdered guy. Even the kids mom said she had no idea why they were talking to him especially after the police said he was in no way a suspect. The one person the bengals really took a chance on, Ahmad Brooks, has done nothing wrong. Just because you have a hard time early in life or even if you had a great time growing up does not mean you will or will not get in trouble later. The league needs to find ways of helping these younger guys adjust to their new lives with money instead of just picking the bengals and saying they are out of control. This is the same reason why poor kids in poor school districts do not succeed because most people just label them as wastes as soon as they get in trouble one time intheir lives.

When a team has one or two incidents a year, most people follow this line of thought. However, when a team has 9 arrrest in 9 months, there is a problem with the selection process. The organization is doing a poor job of character evaluation. That not only reflects badly the Bengals, but the entire NFL. This hurts performance on the field between suspension and questionable disclipline on the part of individuals. Seriously, I could hire 60 guys straight out of prisons and not have that sort of one year arrest record.

axman40
02-04-2007, 09:02 AM
I think Paul Tags owes ESPN's Playmakers an apology!Thanks Bengals,Thanks for nothing!

:tease:

Vinny
02-04-2007, 09:38 AM
I'd hate to live in Cincy and have that team as my local NFL franchise. I've been critical of the Texans eye for talent but at least they don't hire people with known histories of legal problems. Class is a trait that you don't accidentally luck into.

swtbound07
02-04-2007, 01:11 PM
I'd hate to live in Cincy and have that team as my local NFL franchise. I've been critical of the Texans eye for talent but at least they don't hire people with known histories of legal problems. Class is a trait that you don't accidentally luck into.

What about the gentleman of ours who was driving drunk? I don't exactly remember the details, but I could have sworn that weary wasn't our teams first brush with the wrong side of the law

dirty steve
02-04-2007, 01:13 PM
What about the gentleman of ours who was driving drunk? I don't exactly remember the details, but I could have sworn that weary wasn't our teams first brush with the wrong side of the law
that was marcus coleman about 2-3 years ago. the bengals had something like nine guys arrested in one calendar year.

gtexan02
02-04-2007, 01:15 PM
What about the gentleman of ours who was driving drunk? I don't exactly remember the details, but I could have sworn that weary wasn't our teams first brush with the wrong side of the law

That was Coleman, who is no longer here. Not sure what our response was to that incident

ledzeppelin229
02-04-2007, 01:16 PM
What about the gentleman of ours who was driving drunk? I don't exactly remember the details, but I could have sworn that weary wasn't our teams first brush with the wrong side of the law

Coleman, I think? However the fact that its one incident that we can barely remember because it was years ago reflects pretty well on the organization. The Weary case is a strange one because the cops methods were questionable at best and I think it was basically dismissed.

Vinny
02-04-2007, 01:18 PM
What about the gentleman of ours who was driving drunk? I don't exactly remember the details, but I could have sworn that weary wasn't our teams first brush with the wrong side of the lawput any 50 grown men in one place and you are bound to have a few problems here and there....having zero problems would be nice...but unrealistic.

swtbound07
02-04-2007, 01:19 PM
put any 50 grown men in one place and you are bound to have a few problems here and there....having zero problems would be nice...but unrealistic.

wasn't pointing out anything about our organization, more pointing out that we all have short term memories in regard to our own team.

gtexan02
02-04-2007, 01:21 PM
I was so ready to give you some rep on this post, but to lump Darrent Williams in that group with those players just turned me off.

HE was just out having New Years fun on New Years Eve...... no wrong doing whatsoever.. Just an unfortunate guy being targeted by idiots.

There is nothing wrong with unwinding, and going to the clubs, many of us do it, many of our players do it..... heck, one of our guys was tased & arrested..... for no good reason.

I hope I didn't come off as blaming Darrent for that incident, because thats not at all what I meant. I'm not sure what my original train of thought was exactly, but I think what I was trying to say was that the NFL in general seems to be involved in more violent incidents, whether caused by the NFL players or with NFL players as victims, than other sports.

I have no idea what Williams connection was, and by all accounts it sounds like a completely unprovoked incident, but the NFL as an entity seems to be more involved in crime related news stories than other professional sports organizations. And this tragedy, along with the guy from U of Miami, sort of epitomzied that.

I think I was thinking of this because of an article I read by a writer on ESPN. It was really good, about the violent culture that has plagued some african american males. I"ll try and find it and post it here

ledzeppelin229
02-04-2007, 01:24 PM
wasn't pointing out anything about our organization, more pointing out that we all have short term memories in regard to our own team.

Well, since we aren't in Cincinnati we don't have the luxury of being reminded on a monthly basis.

gtexan02
02-04-2007, 01:28 PM
Article: http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=hill/070104

About the author, a young black female writer involved in sports:
http://www.cjrdaily.org/behind_the_news/jemele_hill_on_being_black_fem.php



By Jemele Hill
Page 2

"Wrong place at the wrong time."

Who knew the wrong place to be on New Year's Eve was at a party welcoming in the new year? Who knew the wrong time to be murdered was now – when people are so callous about death that it's almost as if we're asking the victim, "Just what did you do to get yourself murdered?"

There are many words to describe the senseless killing of Denver Broncos cornerback Darrent Williams. Unfortunate. Heartbreaking. Sad. But here's the one word we can't use in describing such a death: Unexpected.




AP Photo/Jack Dempsey
Why are we no longer shocked to hear that a black athlete has been murdered?Over the past 12 months, three NFL players have been shot, and in the past couple weeks, police discovered one NFL player, Bears defensive lineman Tank Johnson, had enough weapons in his home to mount a terrorist attack. University of Miami lineman Bryan Pata was shot to death at his apartment complex in November. In Denver alone, three notable athletes have been shot since 2003 – Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker Joey Porter, Denver Nuggets guard Julius Hodge and now, tragically, Williams.

One unavoidable commonality about these episodes of gunplay: all of the athletes are black.

It leads to an inevitable question from all of us, but particularly mainstream America: Why do black athletes often seem to find themselves either holding a gun or staring down the barrel of one?

Real talk for a moment.

Contrary to stodgy opinions, young men have a right to go out. They want to hang with their peers. They want to talk to women. They want to show off a little of their success. Nothing wrong with any of that – as long as they're careful.

Who they're with, what time they're out and what they have is only a small part of the issue. The larger problem here is the one no one is ready to openly discuss.

While America is generally a violent place, no culture in this country glorifies violence more than the African-American community. And consequently, no other racial group is as disproportionately affected by it.

This isn't to say black people invented violence or have a penchant for it. But far too many of us glorify shooting people for revenge, perceived slights or to prove toughness. Two things you almost always see when "MTV Cribs" features a black superstar: a poster of Tony Montana and a poster of the Godfather. Montana and Michael Corleone, though fictional, are considered heroes by young black men everywhere. Montana and Corleone had one thing in common: both killed people to gain respect.

BET, the same network that saw fit to cut its nightly news program, has a new show called "American Gangster," which "chronicles the life and times of some of Black America's most notorious crime figures." It's explained that the program has a strong moral component and doesn't seek to glorify violence, but on BET's Web site the show is promoted by showing Ving Rhames, the king of cool, in slick gangster apparel – as if he were promoting a music video, not a show about violent criminals.

And sure enough, right beneath Rhames' promo ad, a BET dot.commer says, "Young, black males will look at this [show] as an inspiration."

Now, criminal biographies appear on The History Channel all the time, but the difference is that violence is often marketed to blacks in a way that makes it appear more sexy and daring.

Black men constantly receive the message that they can't make it in life through using legitimate means, and the only way they gain society's respect is through the street game.

This is the mentality black athletes greet when they go to the club. A recent Public Library of Science Medicine study shows black men living in urban America have the shortest life expectancy of any other racial group in the country. The life expectancy of a black man in Cleveland is closer to that of West Africans than the average white American. So wearing a jersey every Sunday doesn't protect you from anything.

Of course, movies and songs don't make people kill people, but they can influence the way people think and live.

But ultimately, if we want to see fewer black athletes as victims of violence, African-Americans must stop worshiping at the altar of their own demise.

Cincinnatikid
02-04-2007, 02:29 PM
I'd hate to live in Cincy and have that team as my local NFL franchise. I've been critical of the Texans eye for talent but at least they don't hire people with known histories of legal problems. Class is a trait that you don't accidentally luck into.

One player, Chris henry had a bad past and he continues to. Ahmad Brooks who everyone on this board despised for his problems is doing great being an adult with the Bengals. There were many arrests, mostly for DUIs, but the team can not do a test on a player to see if they are going to drive home drunk from a bar. They can not pay for 60 people to follow each of the players around 24 hours a day to make sure they are doing what they should. It is unfortunate what happened this season, but in no way can you blame the team for these players' decisions. THey have taken their stance against the problems, they have basically gotten rid of their star defensive player from last year in Odell Thurman, and they are doing what they need to do. What takes class is for people looking in to allow grown men to take the blame for their own actions instead of taking cheap shots at an organization.

gtexan02
02-04-2007, 02:33 PM
One player, Chris henry had a bad past and he continues to. Ahmad Brooks who everyone on this board despised for his problems is doing great being an adult with the Bengals. There were many arrests, mostly for DUIs, but the team can not do a test on a player to see if they are going to drive home drunk from a bar. They can not pay for 60 people to follow each of the players around 24 hours a day to make sure they are doing what they should. It is unfortunate what happened this season, but in no way can you blame the team for these players' decisions. THey have taken their stance against the problems, they have basically gotten rid of their star defensive player from last year in Odell Thurman, and they are doing what they need to do. What takes class is for people looking in to allow grown men to take the blame for their own actions instead of taking cheap shots at an organization.


You take players who have had a history of problems, pay them huge contracts, and then say there is no way the team is to blame?

Before the season, the team built a reputation of taking other people's legal cast offs. Players who were kicked out of their programs, had a record, had a history of being a problem player, etc were joining the Bengals.

Then they have 9 arrests in 9 months. Yes its the players fault who got arrested, but consciously playing, not disciplining, and paying huge salaries to players who have been problems in the past is the TEAMS fault.

The Bengal's this year embarassed the NFL. If they don't find a way to discipline or cut these players, and they have a year like this next year, the entire NFL is going to feel the backlash

Cincinnatikid
02-04-2007, 09:22 PM
One player is no diffference maker. You take any team, and almost all of them had one bad apple. Get over it. The bengals had a bad year and they are not at fault. You take 5 year veterans and one of them got a dui, you are still to blame the organization? that does not make sense. People, men have to be responsible for themselves and you can not blame the team. This is like saying oh " johnny grew up in a bad part of town so he cant help he is a criminal" thats ridiculuous. I teach kids daily who grow up around drug infested areas and they still go to class every day, so dont make the bengals scapgoats for individuals who make mistakes.

gtexan02
02-04-2007, 09:42 PM
One player is no diffference maker. You take any team, and almost all of them had one bad apple. Get over it. The bengals had a bad year and they are not at fault. You take 5 year veterans and one of them got a dui, you are still to blame the organization? that does not make sense. People, men have to be responsible for themselves and you can not blame the team. This is like saying oh " johnny grew up in a bad part of town so he cant help he is a criminal" thats ridiculuous. I teach kids daily who grow up around drug infested areas and they still go to class every day, so dont make the bengals scapgoats for individuals who make mistakes.

I don't think you get what I'm saying. The Bengals knew the players they were taking were problem players. Everyone knew that the Bengal's were taking risky players. Before the season even started people were making jokes about the Bengals already wearing stripes.

And then the arrests start. One every month. And what does the team do? Nothing as long as its winning. Then when they teeter out at the end, the come out publically and say "Behave everyone"

Ridiculous. They took problem players, gave them cushy deals, and didn't penalize them when they screwed up. The Bengals made a lot of mistakes.



Look at it like this. If a kid grows up and his parents tell him "Dont smoke cigarettes." and then he does smoke, and they don't do anything, what sort of message does that send? A lot of these players are in their young twenties, and have gone from rags to riches.

What about the high school kid? He's the #2 player in the country, right? A nd he gets ejected and suspended. And then the league lets him play anyways. What sort of message does that send?

Its just as much the organizations fault as it is the players

Ole Miss Texan
02-04-2007, 10:45 PM
One player is no diffference maker. You take any team, and almost all of them had one bad apple. Get over it. The bengals had a bad year and they are not at fault. You take 5 year veterans and one of them got a dui, you are still to blame the organization? that does not make sense. People, men have to be responsible for themselves and you can not blame the team. This is like saying oh " johnny grew up in a bad part of town so he cant help he is a criminal" thats ridiculuous. I teach kids daily who grow up around drug infested areas and they still go to class every day, so dont make the bengals scapgoats for individuals who make mistakes.

Yea one person can make a difference. One bad example can effect another person or 2. I've seen it a hundred times. I don't want to use peer pressure thats a bad example but...when one dude does something and his 'friends' on the team are with him that aren't all that stand up are a lot more likely to do the same.

Likewise we always talk about bringing in veteran leadership through free agency and how they can help in the locker room. It's the same thing...you bring that one guy in and help some of the young guys by ..'leading by example'.

That's my opinion anyway.

gtexan02
02-04-2007, 10:52 PM
Yea one person can make a difference. One bad example can effect another person or 2. I've seen it a hundred times. I don't want to use peer pressure thats a bad example but...when one dude does something and his 'friends' on the team are with him that aren't all that stand up are a lot more likely to do the same.

Likewise we always talk about bringing in veteran leadership through free agency and how they can help in the locker room. It's the same thing...you bring that one guy in and help some of the young guys by ..'leading by example'.

That's my opinion anyway.

I totally agree. Remember the Vikings a couple years back? One guy sure convinced a bunch of others to make some stupid decisions

Ole Miss Texan
02-04-2007, 10:54 PM
I totally agree. Remember the Vikings a couple years back? One guy sure convinced a bunch of others to make some stupid decisions

hahah sounds like a fun boat ride to me. but then i can't afford the bail.

Cincinnatikid
02-05-2007, 10:28 AM
The did not "take" a big group of troubled players. Other than Chris Henry there were no major players with reputations other than Ahmad Brooks who has not gotten in trouble since being a pro. And you can not blame the team for paying huge salaries to the players because every team does that. I do not condone any of the behavior, and neither does the team or the other players. And you should not outcast a player in college who at the age of 19 made one bad mistake and then say he doesnt deserve to be given a second chance.