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View Full Version : Who all interviewed for Texans head coaching position?


texansfan88
09-17-2004, 12:26 AM
I know Capers and Wade Phillips, who else?

Lucky
09-17-2004, 08:56 AM
Ted Cottrell
Al Saunders
Butch Davis
Art Shell
Gary Kubiak

There may have been others. At the time, I wanted them to pursue Jimmy Johnson. But, that wasn't going to happen.

TexanAggie
09-17-2004, 08:59 AM
I would never want to have Jimmy Johnson as our Head Coach. he might be a winner but allows thugs to be part of his team. Look at Dallas bunch of drug dealing raping thugs.

Texans have too much class for that................

Lucky
09-17-2004, 09:48 AM
I don't think you can point the finger solely at Johnson for the moral abyss the Girls went through. Remember, Tom Landry & Gil Brandt were the guys who brought Michael Irvin & Nate Newton into the organization.

But knowing what I know about Bob McNair now, he & Jimmy would have been like oil & water. Johnson was a very good coach and a great talent evaluator, but he wouldn't fit in with the Texan organization.

kbourda
09-17-2004, 09:50 AM
Let's see............. Johnson with "thugs" equal three Super Bowl rings. Look, every team doesn't have all nice guys on it. At the end of the day, that is how players and coaches are judged. I didn't know Al Saunders was a candidate for the head coaching position. I wouldn't have been mad at that decision at all. With that being said, I feel coach Capers is doing a good job.

kbourda
09-17-2004, 09:51 AM
And before the flaming starts, believe me I am no Cowboys fan period.

Blake
09-17-2004, 02:07 PM
You cant blame a coach for bringing in those types of players unless they're character issues are blantantly obvious. The reason the Cowboys passed on Randy Moss when he was drafted is because he was questionable. It might of been a good move since he is rather mouthy but man is he awesome! You mention some of the awfull players on the Cowboys but what about the ones that had class like Emmit, Troy and Darren Woodson. They were just overshadowed by the other punks.

As for Jimmy, I think it would of been awesome of the Texans picked him up as they're coach. But I like Dom Capers and think he will lead the Texans to sucess down the road. Ya talk about Jimmy being a talent evaluator but look at the future stars that Dom Capers had already picked up.

TheOgre
09-17-2004, 02:36 PM
Even though I am a Longhorn fan, I wanted Kubiak as our first HC.

Vinny
09-17-2004, 02:41 PM
I was hoping for Butch Davis.....and I'm glad we didn't sign him.

geofb
09-17-2004, 02:43 PM
Al Saunders (with 20/20 hindsight) might have been a good choice.

Porky
09-17-2004, 05:42 PM
The more interesting question is who will be interviewed after Capers is fired, IF he can't get the team going by next year. I wish Dick Vermeil was available. Bob Stoopes, or Nick Saban anyone? idonno:

TheOgre
09-17-2004, 05:53 PM
If we win 6 games this year and 8 next year, is that enough? Is slow but continual improvement work in this case?

Porky
09-17-2004, 06:16 PM
I had to creaate a bit of controversy. The board is too boring right now. :hehe:

To answer your question seriouely, 6 this yr and 8 next is very borderline to me.
More importantly, is that enough for Mcnair?

texasguy346
09-17-2004, 07:17 PM
6 this year wouldn't be firing time, but 8 next year would at least raise some concern. It all depends on the circumstances of course. If a crucial player suffered an injury, or if the Texans had a particularly tough schedule then he might have even more job security.

rhc564
09-17-2004, 11:21 PM
excuses for losing equal job security...gotta love it!

JustBonee
09-18-2004, 10:36 AM
All of my favorite College and Pro coaches, past and present, show emotion. Capers is lacking in that department. Standing on the sidelines taking notes, he is slow to react to things happening .. things like coaches challenges. The whole stadium is yelling their heads off to review something and he's MIA many times... doesn't appear to think on his feet. He seems to need time to analyze and dissect what's going on before making any moves.
Noting the mistakes of the game and taking it to the locker room after the game is fine, but doing some game analyzing and making corrections as it is happening is in order too.
Curious what the players thoughts are about their head coach and how they rate him.

ArlingtonTexan
09-18-2004, 10:52 AM
All of my favorite College and Pro coaches, past and present, show emotion. Capers is lacking in that department. Standing on the sidelines taking notes, he is slow to react to things happening .. things like coaches challenges. The whole stadium is yelling their heads off to review something and he's MIA many times... doesn't appear to think on his feet. He seems to need time to analyze and dissect what's going on before making any moves.
Noting the mistakes of the game and taking it to the locker room after the game is fine, but doing some game analyzing and making corrections as it is happening is in order too.
Curious what the players thoughts are about their head coach and how they rate him.

This is just a thought, but does his personality at times come through with the team? Capers is regarded around the league as a good X and O schemer and most of the time has his team mentally prepared. I heard John "the Professor" say sometime in the last couple of weeks that the question people around the league have about Capers is ability to have his team emotionally ready to play week and week out.

texasguy346
09-18-2004, 11:05 AM
excuses for losing equal job security...gotta love it!

That tends to be the nature of the NFL. No one is on a hotter seat than Dave Wandstedt of the Dolphins, but due to the extreme circumstances he might be able to keep his job still at season's end. Personally, I don't think he'll be able to save his job due to the high expectations in Miami, but if the owner likes him enough he might just keep him.

JustBonee
09-18-2004, 11:53 AM
This is just a thought, but does his personality at times come through with the team? Capers is regarded around the league as a good X and O schemer and most of the time has his team mentally prepared. I heard John "the Professor" say sometime in the last couple of weeks that the question people around the league have about Capers is ability to have his team emotionally ready to play week and week out.
Good questions to ponder. Just how does he come thru to the players?
Having a good plan of attack is important obviously, but showing some fire is equally important.

Jwwillis
09-18-2004, 12:12 PM
All of my favorite College and Pro coaches, past and present, show emotion. Capers is lacking in that department. Standing on the sidelines taking notes, he is slow to react to things happening .. things like coaches challenges. The whole stadium is yelling their heads off to review something and he's MIA many times... doesn't appear to think on his feet. He seems to need time to analyze and dissect what's going on before making any moves.
Noting the mistakes of the game and taking it to the locker room after the game is fine, but doing some game analyzing and making corrections as it is happening is in order too.
Curious what the players thoughts are about their head coach and how they rate him.

Examples of Coaches that don't/didn't show much outward emotion on the field

Bum Phillips
Tom Landry
Bud Grant
Tony Dungy
Head coach of the 80's era Steelers cant remember his name.

This is just off the top of my head. These guys weren't too shabby. Going loco on the field makes a head coach look out of control of both the game and himself IMO. Give me a calm cool commander in battle any day.

Jwwillis
09-18-2004, 12:15 PM
6 this year wouldn't be firing time, but 8 next year would at least raise some concern. It all depends on the circumstances of course. If a crucial player suffered an injury, or if the Texans had a particularly tough schedule then he might have even more job security.

Capers and Co. arnt going anywhere in the first 5yrs. regardless.

rhc564
09-18-2004, 06:00 PM
Like the list of Coaches because it mirrors a thought I've posted before-
a team should perform on the field with results that mirror their Coach.
All of the Coach's listed acheived this idea from there players, whether
it was discipline, passion, etc. Capers is thought of as a tough disciplinearan
(sp) who preaches control and desired results. But IMO his players do not
play this way...

TexanExile
09-18-2004, 07:56 PM
I was hoping for Butch Davis.....and I'm glad we didn't sign him.

The good news is, he would've shown GREAT loyalty to his program, promised he'd stay, assure the media that he wasn't going anywhere...

oh wait. Never mind. :rolleyes:

I bet Cleveland wishes now that Davis hadn't been lying to everyone when he said he'd stay at Miami....

Ibar_Harry
09-18-2004, 08:27 PM
Sassy, being cool and calm is an asset if you are observant and thinking which reflects why you are calm. Capers doesn't appear to be able to think on his feet and react to the situations at hand. I think he's so maticulous for that reason. Remember, he is a product of Mr C who is at New York. Mr C is an extemely maticulous man who finds it hard to adapt to changes on the fly. He's also a very emotional coach. While as a student in college, I had a professor who was very much that way. He was considered a brilliant writer, but if he was making a presentation and something went South he was totally lost. I got an A, because I was able to bail him out one day while he was at the board. It has nothing to do with intelligence. Some people just don't process under fire. I'm beginning to believe both Palmer and Capers are of that ilk. They are excellent analyzers, but very poor game time coaches. When Fresno State had Jim Sweeny as the head coach, I felt the same way. When the game was on the line he became frazzled. Again, it seemed to me like he couldn't think when the game was on the line.

Ibar_Harry
09-18-2004, 08:33 PM
I think there is another important attribute associated with the maticulousness and thats an inability to adapt to your players. Capers and Mr C have a form for people to fit. If they don't fit, then they have a problem seeing their worth. For example, some coaches have used the philosophy that the pass establishes the running game rather than the other way around. You will never get Capers to agree with that philosophy. The great coaches adapt to the times and their players. They do not try to make the team what it is not. They utilize their players in ways that take advantage of their good given skills. I think Capers is to rigid in this regard.

JustBonee
09-19-2004, 10:35 AM
Capers is rigid in his style.. agreed. How can that ever be a good thing?
If the team is being asked to 'step it up' a notch this year, will Capers lead in that effort .. It doesn't seem to be in his personality so far. We'll see I guess. Hope he proves me wrong.

Back to emotional coaches .. I don't like lunatics for coaches either.
But two of my favorite coaches of all time.. who 'showed emotion' .. that never let their team :sleep: during a game:
Woody Hayes - Ohio State, and yes, look where emotion got him - FIRED, but he was great. He loved the game and could not separate himself from it ever. And before he flipped out ... he was SUPER!

Another favorite coach ..
John Madden.. 'Mr. Wild Man on the Sidelines' ... flapping his arms and pacing nonstop. He had a huge following of admirers. And no one could ever confuse his style of coaching with Capers. :hehe:

BornOrange
09-19-2004, 11:00 AM
Sassy, being cool and calm is an asset if you are observant and thinking which reflects why you are calm. Capers doesn't appear to be able to think on his feet and react to the situations at hand. I think he's so maticulous for that reason. Remember, he is a product of Mr C who is at New York. Mr C is an extemely maticulous man who finds it hard to adapt to changes on the fly. He's also a very emotional coach.
Dom Capers is definitely not a product of Tom Coughlin. He only spent two seasons at Jacksonville under Coughlin, and that was after spending 13 years in the NFL.....with 4 of those years being a head coach. Jim Mora was his coach from 86-91 (6 seasons), then Bill Cowher from 92-94 (3 seasons), he was head coach at Carolina from 95-98 (4 seasons). Capers was established as a NFL coach before working for Coughlin in the 99 and 00 seasons.