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View Full Version : Gripes about the NFL.


WWJD
08-31-2004, 11:05 AM
I have a few. Would like to hear what some of you don't like.

1. I think practice team players shouldn't have to clear waivers.

2. I hate the defensive back rule of no contact that's being called so much now. I can see where you don't want the receivers mugged but they sure make it hard on the DB's.

3. I don't really like the overtime rule of first team that scores win. I like the college system better.

Mistril48
08-31-2004, 11:37 AM
I have a few. Would like to hear what some of you don't like.

1. I think practice team players shouldn't have to clear waivers.

2. I hate the defensive back rule of no contact that's being called so much now. I can see where you don't want the receivers mugged but they sure make it hard on the DB's.

3. I don't really like the overtime rule of first team that scores win. I like the college system better.
1. the current rule isn't better for the teams (who've invested training in the players and invested in scouting ...) it's just better for the players, who can get a NFL roster sized pay cheque. In theory, it's also better for parity, which the league says it favors.

2. The mugging of the the Colt receivers by the Pats was a joke. You wait all year for a game like that to see the best against the best and then have it spoiled by a clutch/grab fest. I'm glad that something is being done, specifically, emphasizing the existing rule. I believe it will settle down somewhat once the season gets going and you'll see less 'touch' calls. I would also like to see less emphasis on calls against LBs on TEs.

3. I prefer the college rule as well, but its not about fairness. Its about television and this rule is designed to get to a result quicker.

infantrycak
08-31-2004, 11:54 AM
2. The mugging of the the Colt receivers by the Pats was a joke. You wait all year for a game like that to see the best against the best and then have it spoiled by a clutch/grab fest. I'm glad that something is being done, specifically, emphasizing the existing rule. I believe it will settle down somewhat once the season gets going and you'll see less 'touch' calls. I would also like to see less emphasis on calls against LBs on TEs.

The mugging was a joke, but what really seemed to be going on to me was an almost complete lack of rules enforcement by that particular officiating crew. While that Patriots' DB's were mugging the Colts' WR's, the Colts' OL was routinely and in my mind flagrantly holding to give Manning 10 seconds in the pocket--no flags on either side. IMO what should have been the emphasis resulting from the game was something I think Peter King wrote about--consistancy in officiating, both between the regular and post-season and between officiating crews. When there is over a 100% variation on the number of flags thrown by different crews there is a problem. Instead with the new emphasis, from the pre-season it appears there is maybe even a greater spread on how the interference rule is being called with some refs allowing contact that should not have been permitted before the emphasis and others getting so flag happy they have entirely through out interfering with the WR's route part of the rule. The most important thing for any set of rules in consistant enforcement so that people know how to comply with them.

V Man
08-31-2004, 12:03 PM
College overtime is a total joke. College OT is akin to a home run hitting contest to decide a baseball game. You take a perfectly fine game and start excluding important elements and decide a winner on some crazy home run derby style action.

Overtime is just an extension of the clock running down in the 4th quarter. Football has a clock (unlike baseball) and you totally throw that out in the College OT. Special teams are also thrown out the window in the College OT. Great return teams or excellent punt teams are aborted also, so all you have left is a ridiculous down and distance contest to decide the winner.

Football has always been a game played with a clock. Why throw that out the window to decide the winner? If you don't win the coin flip play some defense, because that is an important part of football. In Baseball you can rally in the bottom of the 9th, but in Football you better score before the clock runs out....unless you play college ball where they don't grasp this clock thing.

Agree about keep using the clock, but maybe change it to instead of first team that scores. Play 8 to 10 minute OT and play the whole amount. That way both teams should get a least one time with the ball. :twocents:

V Man
08-31-2004, 12:19 PM
If you could not win the game in regulation when the clock runs down then you should not get the "bottom of the 9'th" to win the game if the other team scores in OT. OT is just an extension of the clock running out in regulation. If you want the ball, play some defense. Stop someone. When you score in regulation as the clock ends the other team doesn't get a "second chance" simply because you have a clock to deal with; game over. Why totally change the game in OT? OT just extends to clock. Hence the term, "Sudden Death".

I know what "Sudden Death" means. Right now most of America loves the College OT, I like you don't. But if they want both teams to get the ball once and get a chance on Offense, I think this is the way to go instead of getting the ball at the opposition's 35. At least it keeps it in the concept of the game. :twocents:

mes311
08-31-2004, 12:19 PM
If it's just an extension of the clock running out, why does the team that has the ball at the very end of the 4th quarter not continue to get the ball in OT at the same down and distance they had it when the clock runs out? It's more like the start of a new game, with a coin flip and a kickoff.

mes311
08-31-2004, 12:33 PM
Teams have no incentive to score to win the game in regulation. Beating the clock is an important part of football.

Okay, that makes sense. 'Sudden Death' OT makes alot more sense when you start talking about the clock. :)

I would much rather have that than a tie. Haha.

TheOgre
08-31-2004, 01:10 PM
I really hate the college OT. For many of the same reasons that Vinny stated. Here are some of my points:

1. If a team has a bad offense they are basically handed 50-55 yards and puts them in scoring position. This gives the advantage IMO to the team with the better defense.

2. This puts emphasis on having a better kicker. If neither team gets a TD in the same OT period, it basically comes to this, especially if neither team gets a first down.

3. It takes out key elements of the game, punt and kick returns.

4. As Vinny said, "College OT is akin to a home run hitting contest to decide a baseball game. " Well said.

STEEL BLUE TEXANS
08-31-2004, 01:11 PM
the only gripe i have is the excessive celebration penalty.

RTP2110
08-31-2004, 06:01 PM
The worst pasrt of college OT, is that they start in scoring range. At least start them at midfield, and make them do SOME work to get into scoring range.

kbourda
08-31-2004, 10:37 PM
the only gripe i have is the excessive celebration penalty.

I echo that a 1000 times over.

Mistril48
09-01-2004, 03:13 PM
If you let the team keep the ball as regulation ran down then you throw out the clock once again...
I can't say that I agree with your analysis of the clock and overtime. The biggest complaint most people have about overtime is that in the professional game, one team gets the ball, scores in their first possession and the game is over. In this scenario, the clock is totally irrevlevant. If someone said to the coach who starts with the ball, "Hey, coach, should we score quick, or slow?" he would say. "It doesn't matter. It's not like the end of the game, when we have to score, but manage how much time is on the clock for our opponent. We can score fast, or slow and the other team doesn't get a chance."

The Texans wish that was the system when they scored against the Titans at home last year, but left too much time on the clock.

No, I would disagree about the clock still being relevant in the strategy of professional overtime. All the clock does is potentially run out after 15 minutes, leaving the tie unresolved, something that doesn't happen in the college system.

TexansCanes
09-01-2004, 06:18 PM
i don't really like the nfl system becasue it gives an unfair advantage to one team. i can hear everyone already when the texans lose in overtime when we never had a chance to get the ball. one thing that would make the cfb ot better is if they moved the ball back to like the 50, most kickers can kick a 42 yard fg.

Mistril48
09-01-2004, 09:08 PM
Why have a clock at all if you are going to give the ball to each team equal times? ... I'm not even sure if I understand your point about scoring slow or scoring fast. You lost me on that one...

My point is if you want a clock, have a clock. Say play one full quarter in overtime, not sudden death (like they did in Olympic soccer). Ending the game when one team wins means there is no clock ... it ends as soon as someone scores. No need to manage the clock. You don't have to 'score slow' like at the end of a game, to avoid another team having enough time on the clock to come back.

I agree with you that there is no clock when both teams get the ball an equal time. I just think they is also no clock in the pro overtime.