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View Full Version : Will the Texans fail to learn from history?


Bobo
12-08-2005, 01:27 AM
This story eerily reminds me of the situation the Texans are facing. Note the results.

http://www.bearshistory.com/lore/enis.html

Napa Auto Parts
12-08-2005, 01:42 AM
So Reggie Bush is the second coming of curtis enis i really dont get how but if it makes you feel better.:texflag:

Bobo
12-08-2005, 01:49 AM
So Reggie Bush is the second coming of curtis enis i really dont get how but if it makes you feel better.:texflag:

As the story said, at the time Enis was the consensus #5 guy and he was a big-time bust. Also remember Archie Griffin and Lawrence Phillips. Their collegiate credentials were huge and they busted big time. Historically, the teams that succeed are those who trade off the big choices or major names and think about strengthening several positions, not just one. Remember Herschel Walker? How about Ricky Williams?

Wharton
12-08-2005, 02:14 AM
Historically, the teams that succeed are those who trade off the big choices or major names and think about strengthening several positions, not just one.

As you have pointed out picking no. 1 doesn't guarantee a solid NFL player nor does it assure a winning record for the franchise. But it can. Here are a few no. 1 picks that marked the changing of a franchise from a loser to a winner.

Earl Campbell, 1978
John Elway, 1983
Bruce Smith, 1985
Troy Aikman, 1989
Payton Manning, 1998

Trading away picks can be a good thing, but IMHO, itís what you do with those picks that count. What is best for the franchise should determine what is done with those picks.

ledzeppelin229
12-08-2005, 02:29 AM
I don't really know the details on Phillips and Enis, but weren't they busts because of injury/character reasons? It didn't really seem to be a lack of talent from what I've read.

Snapple
12-08-2005, 02:31 AM
As the story said, at the time Enis was the consensus #5 guy and he was a big-time bust. Also remember Archie Griffin and Lawrence Phillips. Their collegiate credentials were huge and they busted big time. Historically, the teams that succeed are those who trade off the big choices or major names and think about strengthening several positions, not just one. Remember Herschel Walker? How about Ricky Williams?

1. Herschel Walker was good, but he was never so good that he was worth everything the Vikings traded for him. Most people I think could tell that was a bad deal.

2. Ricky Williams may have left the league for a year, but he was still a solid back when he was around. He carried the Saints and the Dolphins on his back, and the rushing title. The picks the Saints traded went to the Bears. Those picks became Cade McNown, Dwayne Bates, Warrick Holdman, and a couple other losers. And you think the BEARS got the better end of the deal? Are you serious?

Look, I'm against drafting Reggie, because I want Ferguson, but the examples you cited were terrible, especially the Ricky one.

If you think getting a bunch of picks is better than getting one good pick, history is against you.

Example 1: 1977 draft. The Dallas Cowboys trade a bunch of picks to the Seattle Seahawks to move up in the first round. The Cowboys then draft Tony Dorsett, who was one of the greatest Cowboys ever, and the NFL's number two career rushing leader when he retired. The players who the Seahawks drafted with those picks were all benched or cut within a few years after being drafted.

Example 2: In 1994, the Rams moved down the first round to pick up a bunch of picks from the Niners. The 49ers took Bryant Young, who is still playing today because he's arguably the best defensive player the Niners have had for the last decade. The three picks the Rams got for Bryant all were cut from the team within four years.

Example 3: The Jets in 1997 tried to get as many picks as they could for the number one pick. The number one pick went to the Rams for three of their picks. Those three picks were traded down again to get eight picks from various teams. All of those eight picks played their way out of the league within a couple of years. The Rams on the other hand used that number one pick on Offensive Tackle Orlando Pace, who is still playing and almost definitely going into the Hall of Fame when he retires.



So tell me again how that article proves that trading down for more picks always results in a better deal for the team with all the picks? Don't point the finger and say the Texans will fail to learn from history, because it looks like you're the one who didn't learn from history.

Texas_Thrill
12-08-2005, 01:23 PM
Looks its not about where you draft its HOW you draft.

1 or 32 you've got to make good decisions on your players. Nothing is 100% on these guys so you just trying to make it a player with the least risk possible.

I have no idea who we should draft right now b/c the offseason is going to be a BUSY one and I"m hoping we are active in FA for the O-line. That way when draft time comes we are building a line from scratch.