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beerlover
05-02-2014, 01:23 AM
Don't focus on the order as much as the contents: meaning these are the top 10 prospects in this years NFL draft. Courtesy of Rob Rang (@RobRang) is a senior analyst for NFLDraftScout.com. http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/story/24548010/big-board-pitt-penetrator-donald-reaches-no-7-as-steadiest-riser

1. DE Jadeveon Clowney, South Carolina (6-5, 266, 4.53)*: There is no question Clowney failed to live up to expectations in 2013 from a statistical standpoint but as he demonstrated in Indianapolis and again April 2 at his pro day, the South Carolina star possesses a once-in-a-generation combination of size and explosiveness. Whether at defensive end or outside linebacker in a 3-4 alignment, he'll make an immediate impact in the NFL -- precisely why he has been my top-rated prospect since last spring.

2. OT Greg Robinson, Auburn (6-5, 332, 4.92)*: Physical and tenacious, Robinson is a grizzly bear in the running game, mauling opponents with an exciting blend of size, strength and athleticism. Auburn's reliance on the running game, however, provided Robinson few opportunities in pass protection. With some polish, he could prove an Orlando Pace-like presence in the NFL.

3. OLB Khalil Mack, Buffalo (6-3, 251, 4.65): With an FBS-record 16 career forced fumbles and record-tying 75 career tackles for loss, Mack's statistics jump off the page. Against the most gifted opponents he faced last year (Ohio State, Baylor, Connecticut), it was his game that jumped off the screen. Whereas Clowney is largely a projection as a rusher from two-point stance, Mack is a proven commodity in this regard. As I've been reporting since January, he is a very legitimate candidate for the Texans at No. 1 overall and isn't likely to get by Jacksonville at No. 3.

4. OT Jake Matthews, Texas A&M (6-5, 308, 5.07): The son of Hall of Famer Bruce Matthews, Jake proves the cliche true -- the apple doesn't fall far from the tree. He played well at left tackle last season after starring at right tackle for three years and like his father, projects well to any position along the offensive line. Matthews isn't an elite athlete but may just be the safest prospect in the draft.

5. WR Sammy Watkins, Clemson (6-1, 211, 4.43)*: Watkins lacks the elite size that helped A.J. Green, Julio Jones and Calvin Johnson earn top six selections since 2007, but he does possess virtually everything else - including instant acceleration, impressive body control and the natural hands to pluck the ball outside of his frame. Watkins could go as high as No. 2 to the St. Louis Rams.

6. WR Mike Evans, Texas A&M (6-5, 231, 4.53)*: In dominating SEC competition the past two seasons, Evans has earned comparisons to Tampa Bay Bucs star Vincent Jackson, exhibiting a shocking combination of size, strength and deceptive speed. He is a nightmare to defend in jump-ball situations, a trait teams are finding increasingly valuable with the size of cornerbacks growing throughout the NFL.

7. DT Aaron Donald, Pittsburgh (6-1, 285, 4.68): Given the way he dominated competition in the ACC and at the Senior Bowl and combine, no player has enjoyed a steadier rise up draft boards this year than Donald. His size likely limits him to a three-technique role in the 4-3 alignment, but given the NFL's increasing reliance on the pass, he is entering the league at the perfect time to star in just this capacity.

8. OLB Anthony Barr, UCLA (6-5, 255, 4.66): Barr's emergence as one of the nation's elite NFL prospects after languishing as a running back early in his career has been well documented. He exploded in 2012 in his first season on the defensive side of the ball and backed it up with another spectacular campaign in 2013, though he didn't make the gains in technique to match his hype. Questions about his physicality are legitimate but so are his burst, bend and size. Pass rushers are worth gambling on, especially those with Barr's upside.

9. QB Teddy Bridgewater, Louisville (6-2, 214, 4.67)*: Bridgewater's pro day struggles are often used as the rationale for why he could slip on draft but the red flags have more to do with his lack of size. As one GM put it to me, Bridgewater has the build of a wide receiver rather than a franchise quarterback. Sure I have concerns about his relatively slim frame, but Bridgewater has shown toughness, poise and accuracy -- traits I believe make him the most pro-ready quarterback of the class.

10. QB Blake Bortles, Central Florida* (6-5, 232, 4.93): A prototypically-built pocket passer with good awareness, athleticism and arm talent, Bortles looks the part of an NFL star quarterback. He also played well against top talent (including South Carolina, Penn State and Baylor) and showed impressive gains in his technique throughout the off-season workouts. I like Bortles' game and believe he has the most upside of any quarterback in this class, but I'd have a tough time using a top-10 pick on any player I believe would be best served watching from the sideline as a rookie.

I would be happy with any of them. I've seen a lot of Mack recently going to Texans that would be great, cover & fill a lot of needs, but I'm another one of those build the trenches guys and as unpopular as it may be Greg Robinson would enforce the trenches more than any of them, hence my preference, what be yours?

thunderkyss
05-02-2014, 02:07 AM
2. OT Greg Robinson, Auburn (6-5, 332, 4.92)*: Physical and tenacious, Robinson is a grizzly bear in the running game, mauling opponents with an exciting blend of size, strength and athleticism. Auburn's reliance on the running game, however, provided Robinson few opportunities in pass protection. With some polish, he could prove an Orlando Pace-like presence in the NFL.

4. OT Jake Matthews, Texas A&M (6-5, 308, 5.07): The son of Hall of Famer Bruce Matthews, Jake proves the cliche true -- the apple doesn't fall far from the tree. He played well at left tackle last season after starring at right tackle for three years and like his father, projects well to any position along the offensive line. Matthews isn't an elite athlete but may just be the safest prospect in the draft.

5. WR Sammy Watkins, Clemson (6-1, 211, 4.43)*: Watkins lacks the elite size that helped A.J. Green, Julio Jones and Calvin Johnson earn top six selections since 2007, but he does possess virtually everything else - including instant acceleration, impressive body control and the natural hands to pluck the ball outside of his frame. Watkins could go as high as No. 2 to the St. Louis Rams.

6. WR Mike Evans, Texas A&M (6-5, 231, 4.53)*: In dominating SEC competition the past two seasons, Evans has earned comparisons to Tampa Bay Bucs star Vincent Jackson, exhibiting a shocking combination of size, strength and deceptive speed. He is a nightmare to defend in jump-ball situations, a trait teams are finding increasingly valuable with the size of cornerbacks growing throughout the NFL.

9. QB Teddy Bridgewater, Louisville (6-2, 214, 4.67)*: Bridgewater's pro day struggles are often used as the rationale for why he could slip on draft but the red flags have more to do with his lack of size. As one GM put it to me, Bridgewater has the build of a wide receiver rather than a franchise quarterback. Sure I have concerns about his relatively slim frame, but Bridgewater has shown toughness, poise and accuracy -- traits I believe make him the most pro-ready quarterback of the class.

10. QB Blake Bortles, Central Florida* (6-5, 232, 4.93): A prototypically-built pocket passer with good awareness, athleticism and arm talent, Bortles looks the part of an NFL star quarterback. He also played well against top talent (including South Carolina, Penn State and Baylor) and showed impressive gains in his technique throughout the off-season workouts. I like Bortles' game and believe he has the most upside of any quarterback in this class, but I'd have a tough time using a top-10 pick on any player I believe would be best served watching from the sideline as a rookie.


I'm tired of drafting for defense & throwing out band-aid after band-aid on offense.

I like a good strong defense as much as the next guy. I loved watching our defense over the last three years.

But I think the best defense is a strong offense. It wasn't pretty, but a couple of years ago when we were winning the T.O.P. because our defense got off the field & our offense was stingy with the ball, when our offensive line was running roughshod on the best defenses in the league...

That was football. That was exciting. That was winning. That's what I want.

Get me Robinson in the first & you can take defense the rest of the draft. We can start Fitz/Yates/Keenum for all I care.

However, if the Texans think Bridgewater or Bortles rates that high in this draft, they need to take one of them. If they do, I want the best OG/OT we can get with our second pick.

When we play Andrew Luck, I want to see him on the bench all game. Let's see him lead a comeback drive when we're grinding out the last 3 minutes of the game the old fashioned way.

When we play JaDaveon Clowney, I want to see him on his back all day, no matter what side he lines up on.

/rant