PDA

View Full Version : Marshawn Lynch, what I think...


SW H-TOWN
01-29-2014, 07:07 PM
After watching the Jan 29th video I am pretty sure he suffers from some way more than normal anxiety when having to be in front of big crowds, around a group of people he does not know. I actually feel bad for the guy, for me personally it was hard to watch. I wish they would excuse him from the mandatory press meetings. Here is the link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1KxifysLsk

DexmanC
01-29-2014, 07:13 PM
I don't have a problem with his demeanor at all. Those people in the room ain't his friends, and he's just there to play football. Some people require a little emotional honesty from folks asking them questions. Marshawn happens to be one of them.

The "boss" line is classic. Speaks to the prison camp the NFL can be.

SW H-TOWN
01-29-2014, 07:24 PM
I don't have a problem with his demeanor either, I just personally think that he does not speak to the media because he has some pretty tough anxiety when having to be in front of or around a bunch of strangers. From around the 40 second mark until the time that the FB comes in to save him I can just see how nervous he is. As far as boss...when he is interviewed by a person and not a media circus, when he is comfortable, he uses the term a lot less from what I have seen.

2012Champs
01-29-2014, 09:29 PM
I don't have a problem with his demeanor at all. Those people in the room ain't his friends, and he's just there to play football. Some people require a little emotional honesty from folks asking them questions. Marshawn happens to be one of them.

The "boss" line is classic. Speaks to the prison camp the NFL can be.



Not very many prison camps where you can make 10 times the median HH income or many many times more. Also how many prison camps can you just walk away from if you want?

Wolf6151
01-30-2014, 12:58 AM
After watching the Jan 29th video I am pretty sure he suffers from some way more than normal anxiety when having to be in front of big crowds, around a group of people he does not know. I actually feel bad for the guy, for me personally it was hard to watch. I wish they would excuse him from the mandatory press meetings. Here is the link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1KxifysLsk


I agree, he reminds me of Ricky Williams when dealing with the media. I'm thinking some type of anxiety as well.

Norg
01-30-2014, 01:23 AM
dis is dumb IMO forcing players to talk to the media NFL is trying to turn into the WWE

I feel if Lynch does not feel like talking to people he does not know then he shouldn't have to be forced 2

he may have anxiety who knows if that's the case the NFL should be imbressed to forcing him to 2 do this

Vance87
01-30-2014, 03:32 AM
I agree, he reminds me of Ricky Williams when dealing with the media. I'm thinking some type of anxiety as well.

Looks like he was on some 'medicine' to calm him down a bit...he still had nervous ticks though. Like shaking his leg up and down.

Marshall
01-30-2014, 03:49 AM
Not very many prison camps where you can make 10 times the median HH income or many many times more. Also how many prison camps can you just walk away from if you want?

Why should he expose himself to a bunch of buzzards and vultures? They don't want anything but a story they can run with which hurts someone. It's not like these are reporters asking the questions. There are precious few of those anymore. They are gossips and slanderers.

revan
01-30-2014, 04:00 AM
I cant believe how some people there on youtube think he is high while giving an interview. He obviously suffers from anxiety and does not want to be there in front of the cameras. Not everyone wants the spotlight. As long as he gets it done on the field who cares if he speaks to these vultures or not. Just the NFL trying to squeeze every little penny they can from their "product". If Im Pete Carroll I will do whatever it takes to keep my star RB focused and away from those idiots.

Marshall
01-30-2014, 04:05 AM
I cant believe how some people there on youtube think he is high while giving an interview. He obviously suffers from anxiety and does not want to be there in front of the cameras. Not everyone wants the spotlight. As long as he gets it done on the field who cares if he speaks to these vultures or not. Just the NFL trying to squeeze every little penny they can from their "product". If Im Pete Carroll I will do whatever it takes to keep my star RB focused and away from those idiots.

I think I'd limit interview requirements to before the season and after the season. Anything more is counterproductive.

The "Press" is too arrogant, thinking they have a right to interview you or take stalker style photos. They have a right to publish what you willingly tell them, not to invade your private space. Now what you do in public is another matter. That is the purview of harassment when they continue pursuing someone after being told to back off.

Blake
01-30-2014, 06:41 AM
Forcing players to talk to the media is a bunch of bull****.

2012Champs
01-30-2014, 07:27 AM
Why should he expose himself to a bunch of buzzards and vultures? They don't want anything but a story they can run with which hurts someone. It's not like these are reporters asking the questions. There are precious few of those anymore. They are gossips and slanderers.


Your post has nothing to do with what I said so I'm not sure why you quoted me but I think it's a mistake

Marshall
01-30-2014, 07:31 AM
Your post has nothing to do with what I said so I'm not sure why you quoted me but I think it's a mistake

It could be. I thought you were supporting mandatory interviews because of his salary. But I could easily be wrong.

2012Champs
01-30-2014, 07:35 AM
It could be. I thought you were supporting mandatory interviews because of his salary. But I could easily be wrong.


It seems pretty clear my post was addressing the rediculous term "prison camp" but yes you were wrong as I never mentioned or ref to mandatory interviews

b0ng
01-30-2014, 07:42 AM
I don't have a problem with his demeanor either, I just personally think that he does not speak to the media because he has some pretty tough anxiety when having to be in front of or around a bunch of strangers. From around the 40 second mark until the time that the FB comes in to save him I can just see how nervous he is. As far as boss...when he is interviewed by a person and not a media circus, when he is comfortable, he uses the term a lot less from what I have seen.

That FB is Mike Robinson and he owns bones when it comes to interviews and stuff.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79ZilfG2B0E
Keith Olbermann absolutely wrecking the pro football writers over the Lynch stuff.

Marshall
01-30-2014, 08:15 AM
It seems pretty clear my post was addressing the rediculous term "prison camp" but yes you were wrong as I never mentioned or ref to mandatory interviews


Sorry then. I jumped to a conclusion that it was about more. I read between the lines and it should have been blank.

steelbtexan
01-30-2014, 08:38 AM
Forcing players to talk to the media is a bunch of bull****.

^^^^
This

The NFL is intruding on freedom of speech rights. Unfortunately they can get away with this, just like most other corps/companies can.

I just wish the Texans would've traded a 4th rd pick for Lynch. Many on this MB didn't want to make that trade at the time. There's no denying that Lynch is a top 5 RB in the NFL. The guy is a beast. Nah, on 2nd thought the Texans don't need those type of guys on their team.

b0ng
01-30-2014, 08:46 AM
^^^^
This

The NFL is intruding on freedom of speech rights. Unfortunately they can get away with this, just like most other corps/companies can.

I just wish the Texans would've traded a 4th rd pick for Lynch. Many on this MB didn't want to make that trade at the time. There's no denying that Lynch is a top 5 RB in the NFL. The guy is a beast. Nah, on 2nd thought the Texans don't need those type of guys on their team.

At that particular time Lynch had been involved in a hit-and-run while not being terrible on the Bills, he was a guy that was getting just over 1000 yards and about 7 or 8 TD's a season.

He has also received a DUI since being on the Seahawks so eh.

jaayteetx
01-30-2014, 08:55 AM
^^^^
This

The NFL is intruding on freedom of speech rights. Unfortunately they can get away with this, just like most other corps/companies can.

I just wish the Texans would've traded a 4th rd pick for Lynch. Many on this MB didn't want to make that trade at the time. There's no denying that Lynch is a top 5 RB in the NFL. The guy is a beast. Nah, on 2nd thought the Texans don't need those type of guys on their team.

Freedom of speech? Not even close, go take a look at the amendment again.

jaayteetx
01-30-2014, 08:56 AM
I don't have a problem with his demeanor at all. Those people in the room ain't his friends, and he's just there to play football. Some people require a little emotional honesty from folks asking them questions. Marshawn happens to be one of them.

The "boss" line is classic. Speaks to the prison camp the NFL can be.

Prison camp? Sign me up boss. For the paycheck, at least.

steelbtexan
01-30-2014, 09:10 AM
At that particular time Lynch had been involved in a hit-and-run while not being terrible on the Bills, he was a guy that was getting just over 1000 yards and about 7 or 8 TD's a season.

He has also received a DUI since being on the Seahawks so eh.

I don't care I just want the best FOOTBALL players on the team and could care less about their personal lives.

steelbtexan
01-30-2014, 09:12 AM
Freedom of speech? Not even close, go take a look at the amendment again.

I agree with you. However that doesn't make what corps/businesses are doing right?

HOU-TEX
01-30-2014, 09:13 AM
As much as I dislike a majority of the media, it's his obligation as an NFL player to cooperate with the media. Heck, I'd rather not have to see or listen to the dude talk, but it's the rules, and he knows it. Randy Moss had to do it. Marvin Harrison had to do it as well as many others, I'm sure. Get your ass up there, do your mandatory time and go away. Quit making a mockery of the system

Do I think they should modify the rules? You bet! I have a huge issue speaking to masses too. I know for a fact I'd try to avoid it like the plague. But, it's the rules

I think Lynch is a bad ass RB. He's old school to me and I dig that. But, like I said, ya gotta do what ya gotta do

infantrycak
01-30-2014, 09:44 AM
I don't care I just want the best FOOTBALL players on the team and could care less about their personal lives.

While I generally agree with you given the current NFL rules on drugs and alcohol NFL teams have to take those into consideration. As much as I think the NFL should take its nose out of things like smoking pot, being a player who may be suspended at any time for a year has to be factored in.

I agree with you. However that doesn't make what corps/businesses are doing right?

The NFL is probably one of the worst examples around for this argument. The money is generated virtually entirely off the game and the "knights" "warriors" etc. who play it and the players are guaranteed a % of that income. So I see no problem with the NFL saying "look, we and you make all our money off of media attention so we have to be available to the media."

Having said that I think it is stupid for the NFL not to have some procedure for a player to privately say this goes beyond something I don't like doing because of X, please grant an exception.

Mr teX
01-30-2014, 10:09 AM
Dude is from the streets and has that mentality. He looks uncomfortable, but i bet it's nothing related to actual fear of being in front of the camera...I think it's more related to him not knowing how to express himself well enough without using street venacular and/or cursing a ton....some people have that problem..

here is the only interview he's ever done and even in this he has a couple of slips of the tougue......
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zaJXI7669sQ

Playoffs
01-30-2014, 10:21 AM
...here is the only interview he's ever done and even in this he has a couple of slips of the tougue......
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zaJXI7669sQ

And then when I finally did land in Buffalo, it was like... Oh, man. :spit:

SW H-TOWN
01-30-2014, 10:38 AM
Good point but I still personally think he is having a full on panic attack. He curses in almost all interviews but when he is in a comfortable setting his demeanor is totally different. Here is why I believe that.

From about the 40 second mark until 2:15 he is showing some pretty obvious signs of having a panic attack.

2:06-2:07 he sends a not verbal sign to Michael Robinson to "step in" followed by some words I can't make out.

3:56-3:59 Robinson assures him that he has his back meaning just stay calm, I'm right here

5:46-until the end of the video. Lynch is aggravated because he feels trapped in. If you are having a panic attack due to being around a large group of strangers what you want more than anything else is to remove yourself from the situation...that is why he is pissed.

Again this is just my personal opinion but you cannot tell me that the NFL has not picked up on this, I just think that they prefer the ratings...

One other thing, the Marshawn Deon interview has to be one of the best interviews I have seen. Props to Marshawn for giving all those Nike billboard one-liners, especially under the conditions.

Norg
01-30-2014, 10:46 AM
well one thing if lynch does not like talking to the cameras one good thing the more he does it the more uhh he gets used to it if he does have some shyness or anxiety facing your fears and doing it pretty much destroys the anxiety IMO

Double Barrel
01-30-2014, 11:11 AM
Forcing players to talk to the media is a bunch of bull****.

I agree completely. This is NFL marketing putting the hype machine in front of the actual game itself.

There are many players who feel comfortable with the media. Let them do the talking, because there are plenty of them who have plans to get into media after their football careers are over.

I don't buy into the obligation mentality. The NFL is a 10 billion dollar industry because of these athletes. It's a symbiotic relationship, for sure, but to me, don't make your product uncomfortable because a bunch of press that never covers the NFL now wants interviews. All this other media and marketing crap is just a freakin' circus.

These players owe us nothing beyond what they get paid to do on the field. Any other perspective is just being selfish and loses sight of what really should matter in the NFL - the games.

infantrycak
01-30-2014, 11:25 AM
I agree completely. This is NFL marketing putting the hype machine in front of the actual game itself.

...

These players owe us nothing beyond what they get paid to do on the field. Any other perspective is just being selfish and loses sight of what really should matter in the NFL - the games.

They don't even owe us the game. They do owe the commitment of their contracts to the league/team and this is one of them.

This is a subject where the marketing hype is integral. These players make money, a rare guaranteed %, generated by that marketing hype not just the game.

To repeat though - the NFL should have a means for players to get out of it due to special circumstances.

Double Barrel
01-30-2014, 11:37 AM
I understand the contractual obligations, but c'mon, this is the Super Bowl. Our heads are going to explode if they continue to pump up the hype more than they already do now. I don't see Goodell up there being asked stupid, goofy questions, and he makes more per year than most of these players.

This should be about FOOTBALL, not the continuous digging of irrelevant minutia regarding every single, little aspect of each player.

It just seems like the hype is now becoming more important than he game itself. I'd rather go back to the times of a week between conference games and the Super Bowl.

infantrycak
01-30-2014, 11:45 AM
I am not saying all the NFL's marketing decisions are correct. I don't watch any of this stuff. Just saying the player's contract is tied to more than just the game and with the good comes the bad.

Ask the players to identify the top 3 off the field requirements they hate the most, maybe this will be one of them. Then ask them if they will trade the cap going down from $120 mil to $110 mil in exchange for getting rid of them.

WolverineFan
01-30-2014, 11:50 AM
The guy obviously is uncomfortable talking to strangers and probably has some sort of anxiety disorder. The NFL was going to fine him for skipping interviews during the season, but at the last minute decided not to. I'm guessing they see something similar.

I find it preposterous that the PFWA is "appalled" at the lack of access to him. There's 100 other plays there to talk to, but they are taking a personal affront at his lack of access to them. They could care less if it was a lack of access to someone else, but because he won't talk to them it's personal. And they made it personal with their public response (outrage) at him not wanting to give interviews.

I'm appalled as well.....

infantrycak
01-30-2014, 11:52 AM
The guy obviously is uncomfortable talking to strangers and probably has some sort of anxiety disorder. The NFL was going to fine him for skipping interviews during the season, but at the last minute decided not to. I'm guessing they see something similar.

I liked that the NFL basically told the reporters to F off, he had done what he needed to do.

WolverineFan
01-30-2014, 12:09 PM
I liked that the NFL basically told the reporters to F off, he had done what he needed to do.

I love how he handled it. They told him to show up, so he did. He talked for 2 minutes then sat in the corner with headphones on for the rest of the time. Could totally be the next 'beats by Dre' commercial.

However, the ego of the media will never be overcome. The Super Bowl game may be about the players, but Super Bowl week is about the media. They have made sure of that. And getting slighted by one player makes him an easy target for their wrath and injured pride. I mean, how dare that one player not talk to us! It's appalling!

infantrycak
01-30-2014, 12:24 PM
I love how he handled it. They told him to show up, so he did. He talked for 2 minutes then sat in the corner with headphones on for the rest of the time. Could totally be the next 'beats by Dre' commercial.

However, the ego of the media will never be overcome. The Super Bowl game may be about the players, but Super Bowl week is about the media. They have made sure of that. And getting slighted by one player makes him an easy target for their wrath and injured pride. I mean, how dare that one player not talk to us! It's appalling!

I agree. The media are acting like petulant children.

Dutchrudder
01-30-2014, 12:30 PM
If Lynch needs help with this issue then he should be contacting the Players Union. They have the power to negotiate these things on his and the other players behalf.

Playoffs
02-01-2014, 01:35 PM
Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch had been scheduled to show up as a guest on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon.

But practice went too long on Friday for the Seahawks, and Lynch wasn’t able to make it.
http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2014/01/31/marshawn-lynch-was-scheduled-to-appear-on-jimmy-fallons-show-tonight/

Playoffs
07-24-2014, 06:57 PM
Ian Rapoport ‏@RapSheet
The #Seahawks learned in the last few days that Marshawn Lynch would hold out for camp. And no, they still don’t plan on paying him.

Adam Schefter ‏@AdamSchefter
Seahawks RB Marshawn Lynch, scheduled to make $5.5M this season, told former teammate @RealMikeRob he is holding out of training camp.

http://www.americanwx.com/bb/public/style_emoticons/default/popcorn.gif http://www.sherv.net/cm/emoticons/drink/popcorn-and-drink-smiley-emoticon.gif http://files.abovetopsecret.com/files/img/qq528e64cb.gif

Playoffs
01-28-2015, 01:57 PM
Just heard this this week for the first time,

Surprised I haven't before...

Is Marshawn Lynch a modern day football Earl Campbell?

https://usatthebiglead.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/marshawn-lynch-beastly-run-against-houston.gif
https://cdn2.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/rjEl-GlNY-PvpVyTF6X2UA2_mWk=/cdn0.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/2862260/beastmooode.0.gif
http://s3.amazonaws.com/rapgenius/1377067454_Football_breaks_tackles67ydTD.gif

"I've never seen anybody win the game in the media. But at the same time, I understand what it could do for you, if you wanted to be someone who talks a lot. But that's not me.

"And I'm not as comfortable, especially at the position I play, making it about me. As a running back, it takes five offensive linemen, a tight end, a fullback and possibly two wide receivers, in order to make my job successful. But when I do interviews, most of the time it'll come back to me. There are only so many times I can say, 'I owe it to my offensive linemen,' or, 'The credit should go to my teammates,' before it becomes run down.

"This goes back even to Pop Warner. You'd have a good game and they'd want you to give a couple of quotes for the newspaper, and I would let my other teammates be the ones to talk. That's how it was in high school, too. At Cal, I'd have my cousin, Robert Jordan, and Justin Forsett do it.

"Football's just always been hella fun to me, not expressing myself in the media. I don't do it to get attention; I just do it 'cause I love that s#!t."

Double Barrel
01-28-2015, 03:17 PM
Just heard this this week for the first time,

Surprised I haven't before...

Is Marshawn Lynch a modern day football Earl Campbell?



uhhhhh...NO.

http://stream1.gifsoup.com/view7/4590505/earl-campbell-ram-o.gif

Lynch is obviously a great RB, but he's not a legend.

thunderkyss
01-28-2015, 04:30 PM
I think Lynch is telling the fans F.U. every time he refuses to answer the media's questions.

I don't understand how some fans are all on his side about this whole thing. Like McClain says... he could care less what Marshawn Lynch has to say. The reporters are there asking the questions for the fans.

If I were the NFL, I'd hold it against the NFLPA. Tell them to get their player in check, or be in breach of contract.

StarStruck
01-28-2015, 04:37 PM
I think Lynch is telling the fans F.U. every time he refuses to answer the media's questions.

I don't understand how some fans are all on his side about this whole thing. Like McClain says... he could care less what Marshawn Lynch has to say. The reporters are there asking the questions for the fans.

If I were the NFL, I'd hold it against the NFLPA. Tell them to get their player in check, or be in breach of contract.

I heard that his beef was more with being burned by media taking what he said out of context to suit their purpose while making him look like a jerk. If true I understand. I think being burned by media not only pisses you off but also makes one more cautious.

WolverineFan
01-28-2015, 04:55 PM
I think Lynch is telling the fans F.U. every time he refuses to answer the media's questions.

I don't understand how some fans are all on his side about this whole thing. Like McClain says... he could care less what Marshawn Lynch has to say. The reporters are there asking the questions for the fans.

If I were the NFL, I'd hold it against the NFLPA. Tell them to get their player in check, or be in breach of contract.

He's clearly telling the media and the league F.U., not the fans. He's been burned by the media before so he wants nothing to do with them anymore. He also has a social anxiety and doesn't feel comfortable sitting in front of a large group of strangers with a mic in his face.

It wouldn't even be an issue if the media didn't take exception to it and now has an axe to grind against him. They feel slighted and are taking it personally. They try to make him look like a fool out of spite instead of just respecting his wish to be left alone. It's only a story because the media wishes to make it a story.

Double Barrel
01-28-2015, 06:14 PM
I think Lynch is telling the fans F.U. every time he refuses to answer the media's questions.

I don't understand how some fans are all on his side about this whole thing. Like McClain says... he could care less what Marshawn Lynch has to say. The reporters are there asking the questions for the fans.

If I were the NFL, I'd hold it against the NFLPA. Tell them to get their player in check, or be in breach of contract.

I think he's being a little punk about it. Dude gets paid millions to play a kid's game. Just do the freakin' interviews for the fans that buy your merch. Everyone else knows the business, but this guy thinks he's special and above it. I lost respect for the guy after yesterday. Something about it just rubbed me the wrong way. It is a very chump attitude, IMO.

austins23
01-28-2015, 06:21 PM
E60, or Sportscenter did a segment on him a while back. It was about his upbringing through the rough neighborhoods of where he is from. He talked to the reporter for quite a bit in that interview.

He wasn't very articulate and he had a few F-bombs "beeped" out. As someone suggested, maybe he has something wrong with him. Who knows?

I'm in the "come on man, really?" camp. Just deal with it for the 5 or 15 minutes and be done with it.

Showtime100
01-28-2015, 06:45 PM
I think he's being a little punk about it. Dude gets paid millions to play a kid's game. Just do the freakin' interviews for the fans that buy your merch. Everyone else knows the business, but this guy thinks he's special and above it. I lost respect for the guy after yesterday. Something about it just rubbed me the wrong way. It is a very chump attitude, IMO.

There you go again, articulating my thoughts better than I would have. :kingkong: :D

Playoffs
01-28-2015, 07:15 PM
Marshawn Lynch's Oakland ties reveal Seahawks star's spirit
(http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000464640/article/marshawn-lynchs-oakland-ties-reveal-seahawks-stars-spirit)
"Everything about Oakland," he told me then, "is everything about me."
...
While spending time with Lynch's family members and close friends and visiting some of his favorite spots, I kept coming back to the same conclusion: Oakland made Lynch who he is, as a player and a person, and his goal in life is to repay and replenish the beleaguered East Bay city with everything he's got.

"He is like the mayor of Oakland," says Kevin (KP) Parker, an Oakland native who is one of Lynch's mentors, and who works as the player development director at nearby Cal, where Lynch starred from 2004 to 2006. "He is probably the biggest name in Oakland, not because of what he does so much on the field, but because of what he does in the community.

"He goes to the high schools and middle schools and checks in on the kids. He feeds the community. He clothes the community. He gives back -- turkey drives, toy drives, coat drives. That gives you more love than anything you do as a football player. 'Cause a lot of people don't have TVs in Oakland -- they don't even watch him play football. But they know when there's a turkey drive, and they're lining up by the hundreds ... 'Who put this on? Marshawn Lynch.' "

Like many well-compensated athletes, Lynch has made a point of giving back to the community, establishing the Fam 1st Family Foundation and putting on the types of events cited by Parker. Yet Lynch doesn't see his acts of generosity as charity so much as he does civic duty.

Raised by a single mother, Lynch saw his share of struggles as a child. As he told me last year, "I don't think I ever had a lowest point while on an active NFL roster. My lowest point came (growing up), when we were trying to figure out what we were gonna eat at night. My lowest point came when I'd wash my jeans at night -- and hopefully they were dry by the morning, so I wouldn't have to go to school in wet jeans. Or, if they were still damp, I'd iron 'em so at least they'd be hot for a moment."

While driven by the desire to give himself a better life, Lynch never wanted to make it out of Oakland. Rather, he strove to put himself in a position where he could help make Oakland better.
...
"...he's made it through, but he doesn't want to leave his community. And that is my son's ultimate goal when he's done with the NFL: to open up a youth center. So hopefully he can make that dream come true, too."

For all of the organized events sponsored by Lynch's foundation, the random acts of kindness -- and constant connection to the community -- are what provoke the uncanny adulation he feels when he's back home.
...
When people say Lynch will give a kid the shirt off his back, they're not necessarily being metaphorical.
...
Lynch frequently visits his high school, Oakland Tech, where he habitually interacts with students and encourages them to achieve academically.

"He was at Tech one day, and there was this guy who saw Marshawn's shoes and got really excited," Delisa recalled. "He was like, 'Oooh, Marshawn, I wish I could have a pair of shoes like those. Those are so nice. They're so tight.' And Marshawn was like, 'Well, what size do you wear?' And the little guy told him what size, and it just so happened to be the same size Marshawn had on. He took those shoes off and he gave 'em to the little guy and he left that school with no shoes on his feet. And it was cold that day, too."

Then there was the time Lynch found out that a Tech student didn't have a car with which to drive his date to the prom.

"He'd seen the kid working hard in school, and he appreciated what the kid was doing, and he took notice," said Delton Edwards, who was Lynch's coach at Oakland Tech. "Marshawn overheard him complaining about how he was gonna get to prom. So he just goes up to him one day and says, 'Hey, you wanna drive my Benz to the prom?'

"He said, 'What I'mma do is, I'm gonna go get it detailed. I'm gonna be in the backseat. I'm gonna let you drive it. When y'all get there, get out, and I'll take the car, and I'll come back and let you drive it home.'

"How many people would have done that -- high school kid just getting his license, and you let him drive an $80,000 Mercedez-Benz?"
...
"It is truly rough here," Parker said. "Oakland will swallow you up, if you allow it to. But if you're strong-minded and know what you want in life, you can make it, and you're gonna have some tools in your toolbox.
...
When his work is done, rest assured that Lynch will show love to his hometown on a level that is truly touching.

"Marshawn is Oakland," Parker said. "He is a Town kid. He comes home a lot during the season -- flies in on Mondays, then he flies up probably the last flight on Tuesday, just 'cause he has to come taste the air, gotta come get the smell of it for his upcoming work week. Come outta the airport, smell the air, go to a couple food spots, see a couple friends, and he'll get back home to work.

"So yeah -- he's Oakland, through and through."

banned1976
01-28-2015, 07:26 PM
The questions asked on radio row are usually non-productive. I don't really care what a HC's favorite cartoon character is or what they like to eat for breakfast. And questions that are asked that are interesting or provocative aren't going to be answered anyway. Someone asked Blount today if he schemed his way out of Pittsburgh so he could return to the Patriots. He just laughed and ignored the question.

Seriously, I don't know why I should care about what Lynch has to say. Which is why I don't.

Speedy
01-28-2015, 07:56 PM
You work for a company and part of that company's job requirement is to talk to the media. So talk to the media or find another job.

I do get the player's perspective though. Reporters are idiots and ask a lot of stupid questions, repeat questions and so on. You get taken out of context at times just so that reporter can generate clicks to a website and things of that nature, so I get not wanting to put yourself out there.

But, the NFL company requires it so you've got to do it.

banned1976
01-28-2015, 08:53 PM
You work for a company and part of that company's job requirement is to talk to the media. So talk to the media or find another job.

I do get the player's perspective though. Reporters are idiots and ask a lot of stupid questions, repeat questions and so on. You get taken out of context at times just so that reporter can generate clicks to a website and things of that nature, so I get not wanting to put yourself out there.

But, the NFL company requires it so you've got to do it.

The NFL says talk to the media or receive a fine. Not be fired! So Lynch opted for the fine. He had that option, he chose it.

Wolf
01-28-2015, 09:04 PM
http://deadspin.com/marshawn-lynch-already-explained-why-he-hates-talking-t-1682306801

He explained why he hates talking to the media

I realize he taking a position. But I find it childish with the way he is doing it just take the fine and move on.

Ryan
01-28-2015, 09:25 PM
I like all of the sports media world freaking out about it and making it seem like they're a gift to the athletes and not just a nuisance as a part of the job.

In all reality though, Marshawn probably has some sort of social anxiety and that isn't to be taken lightly. If he's not comfortable talking in front of 100 people, he shouldn't have to.

thunderkyss
01-29-2015, 07:01 AM
Remember how we felt when Arian pulled his, "I'm just trying to be the best teammate I can be."

For us, Marshawn Lynch isn't a big deal, because we couldn't care less what he thinks... most of us. But that guy has fans, people who want to know what makes him tick, someone who may even be able to use his story to straighten their lives out, who knows?

But it's the fans that make the NFL & to me, this is no different than some stuck up "star" refusing to sign an autograph.

HOU-TEX
01-29-2015, 08:52 AM
I think he's being a little punk about it. Dude gets paid millions to play a kid's game. Just do the freakin' interviews for the fans that buy your merch. Everyone else knows the business, but this guy thinks he's special and above it. I lost respect for the guy after yesterday. Something about it just rubbed me the wrong way. It is a very chump attitude, IMO.

There you go again, articulating my thoughts better than I would have. :kingkong: :D

DB tends to do that a lot to myself as well.

I think the dude's one of, if not the, best RBs in the league when he wants to be. He's relentless with the ball in his hands.

Like DB said, his antics towards the media and grabbing his package on national TV has hurt his image more than help it. Unless you're a thuggy, swaggy...or whatev the slang is theses days, kind of guy.

All that said, I'm not giving the media a pass either. These fools are running up to his podium to question him when they know darn well what he's going to do. Then they get all butt hurt when he doesn't answer their stupid questions. Then you have espn and NFLN airing the BS for hours after he acts a fool.

:endrant:

thunderkyss
01-29-2015, 09:16 AM
Greg Koch & ND Kalu just aired a great interview with Delanie Walker. Good questions, very informative.

santo
01-29-2015, 09:19 AM
Remember how we felt when Arian pulled his, "I'm just trying to be the best teammate I can be."

For us, Marshawn Lynch isn't a big deal, because we couldn't care less what he thinks... most of us. But that guy has fans, people who want to know what makes him tick, someone who may even be able to use his story to straighten their lives out, who knows?

But it's the fans that make the NFL & to me, this is no different than some stuck up "star" refusing to sign an autograph.

I see what you're saying, but he has the right to refuse talking to the media if he feels like it. It doesn't bother me with Foster and it doesn't bother me with him. I just don't want to become this fan:

http://irex3.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/fan.jpg

infantrycak
01-29-2015, 10:19 AM
I see what you're saying, but he has the right to refuse talking to the media if he feels like it.

The right? That's like saying you have the right to steal cars if you're willing to do 5 years in jail.

santo
01-29-2015, 10:27 AM
The right? That's like saying you have the right to steal cars if you're willing to do 5 years in jail.

I should have said he has the right to say the same thing over and over like Foster does to the media. If he's not comfortable in front of the media, so be it. Doesn't bother me one bit as long as he produces on the field.

Double Barrel
01-29-2015, 11:13 AM
DB tends to do that a lot to myself as well.

I think the dude's one of, if not the, best RBs in the league when he wants to be. He's relentless with the ball in his hands.

Like DB said, his antics towards the media and grabbing his package on national TV has hurt his image more than help it. Unless you're a thuggy, swaggy...or whatev the slang is theses days, kind of guy.

All that said, I'm not giving the media a pass either. These fools are running up to his podium to question him when they know darn well what he's going to do. Then they get all butt hurt when he doesn't answer their stupid questions. Then you have espn and NFLN airing the BS for hours after he acts a fool.

:endrant:

I generally agree with you about modern media. Too often they create stories from little and sensationalize things to the point of regurgitated redundancy.

All that said, the media is part of the gigantic machine that helps pump the NFL into the 10 billion dollar entertainment empire that we see today.

And what Marshawn Lynch has to understand is that his massive salaries are a direct result of that entertainment machine. The hype, gloss, and constant publicity is part of what drives that engine, and he is a direct beneficiary of it.

We all have to do things in our jobs that we dread. Why should he be excluded from a basic job requirement of an entertainment industry? 100 other players in this game understand the dynamics, so what makes him special? There is an arrogance about it that just rubs me the wrong way.

Maybe he's a great guy in real life and really believes in his charities. I don't know the man. But, like Warren Sapp said last night, why not use this international media platform to further your causes? Why not use this exposure to help those less fortunate? That's the part that doesn't make sense to me. Fine, don't like the media, but use the system to your advantage instead of being a diva and acting like you are better than everyone else. That is how he is coming across to many of us.

Of course, he has no problem in using that same media platform to push his brand. And now he's butthurt because the league could fine him for it.

infantrycak
01-29-2015, 11:17 AM
And what Marshawn Lynch has to understand is that his massive salaries are a direct result of that entertainment machine. The hype, gloss, and constant publicity is part of what drives that engine, and he is a direct beneficiary of it.

And he does understand that and try to benefit from it. He was wearing a hat from his new Beast Mode clothing line.

Double Barrel
01-29-2015, 11:28 AM
And he does understand that and try to benefit from it. He was wearing a hat from his new Beast Mode clothing line.

yep, that's what I was talking about with my last point, and the reason why I don't buy that he's unable to speak to the media. He's just being an arrogant diva, at least that's my perception from the outside looking in.

And now I hear that he's whining because the league could fine him for promoting a product that was not approved by the NFL.

thunderkyss
01-29-2015, 11:32 AM
Very nice interview with Mohammed Sanu on Mad Radio.

StarStruck
01-29-2015, 01:26 PM
I just saw an interview that Lynch had with Deion Sanders. He didn't talk a lot but answered the questions.

The1ApplePie
01-29-2015, 02:13 PM
I heard that his beef was more with being burned by media taking what he said out of context to suit their purpose while making him look like a jerk. If true I understand. I think being burned by media not only pisses you off but also makes one more cautious.

Wasn't Arian Foster butthurt with the local media because of the whole "forced abortion" thing? If I remember right, he still talked to national press.

Lynch seems to be the opposite, and doesn't like the national guys.

JPPT1974
01-29-2015, 02:46 PM
Really he lets his running do the talking. They do not call him Beast Mode for nothing!

bah007
01-29-2015, 03:06 PM
It's in his contract. He needs to sit down and answer the questions.

Now, how he answers those questions are up to him. And if the reporters don't find his answers informative or entertaining then they should go ask questions to someone else.

That's where I stand at least. I think the way he behaves is childish but I think the media has handled this even worse than he has.

banned1976
01-29-2015, 04:38 PM
Remember how we felt when Arian pulled his, "I'm just trying to be the best teammate I can be."

For us, Marshawn Lynch isn't a big deal, because we couldn't care less what he thinks... most of us. But that guy has fans, people who want to know what makes him tick, someone who may even be able to use his story to straighten their lives out, who knows?

But it's the fans that make the NFL & to me, this is no different than some stuck up "star" refusing to sign an autograph.

Maybe there are fans that want to know what motivates Lynch, what his favorite movies are, what cereal he likes to eat for breakfast, does he like dogs or cats, blah, blah, blah. What does he think about Roger Goodell, I don't think we actually need to hear him verbalize what he thinks of Goodell to know the answer to that question. But for the majority of Seahawks fans every time he breaks a tackle for a long gain and every time he helps them win, and every time he carries the ball in yet another Super Bowl, the frustration over him not answering stupid senseless questions by a media that's just looking for attention for themselves vanish.

When Foster was pulling his little nonsense with the media it was after another injury plagued season in which he had a severe image problem on a team that just went 2-14. Had the Texans just won a Super Bowl and he was a big part of it, like Lynch was for Seattle last year, few would give a rats behind that he was playing games with the media.

I don't know any Seahawks fans but I imagine more of them find it amusing when Lynch sticks it to the current commissioner than find it irritating that he doesn't play nice to the national media.

Double Barrel
01-29-2015, 05:12 PM
Marshawn Lynch didn't have any problem talking to the media in high school (http://ftw.usatoday.com/2015/01/marshawn-lynch-high-school-interview)

Marshall
01-30-2015, 06:48 AM
Just heard this this week for the first time,

Surprised I haven't before...

Is Marshawn Lynch a modern day football Earl Campbell?

No. He is running around too many defenders. Earl ran over and through defenders.

Marshall
01-30-2015, 06:56 AM
I think Lynch is telling the fans F.U. every time he refuses to answer the media's questions.

I don't understand how some fans are all on his side about this whole thing. Like McClain says... he could care less what Marshawn Lynch has to say. The reporters are there asking the questions for the fans.

If I were the NFL, I'd hold it against the NFLPA. Tell them to get their player in check, or be in breach of contract.

That made me laugh. The reporters are there to get stories for themselves and creating them through the creation of controversy at pressers is often their tool of choice.

Kudo's to Lynch. Take the righteous stand against the enemy and give them nothing to work with except your rejection of their kind.

My repetitious line would be, "That's none of your business." I would repeat that after every inane and stupid question which would be almost all, if not all of them.

Another way of doing this in a humorous manner is to type out ten stale answers on a card and answer every question with only the number.

Reporter: What did you think about your run to the end zone?

Lynch: Number 3 ( I couldn't do anything without the help of my team mates and coaches.)

Reporter; Boxers or briefs?

Lynch: Number 2 (That's none of your business)

and so on and so forth.

thunderkyss
01-30-2015, 07:12 AM
That made me laugh. The reporters are there to get stories for themselves and creating them through the creation of controversy at pressers is often their tool of choice.
.

I've been listening to 610 & 790 all week & there have been nothing but one great interview after another with all kinds of players. I'm thankful that those guys are out there participating in those interviews.

Marshall
01-30-2015, 08:40 AM
I've been listening to 610 & 790 all week & there have been nothing but one great interview after another with all kinds of players. I'm thankful that those guys are out there participating in those interviews.

Voluntary interviews are usually entertaining.

I propose that the NFL simply adopt the freedom agenda for it's players and stop trying to placate the rogue press by imposing MANDATORY INTERVIEWS and MANDATORY CONFERENCES on the players and coaches. Perhaps just create a position of Press Relations so lazy and worthless reporters can get their daily bowl of porridge spoon fed to them. The good reporters have no need of them.

thunderkyss
01-30-2015, 08:52 AM
Voluntary interviews are usually entertaining.

I propose that the NFL simply adopt the freedom agenda for it's players and stop trying to placate the rogue press by imposing MANDATORY INTERVIEWS and MANDATORY CONFERENCES on the players and coaches. Perhaps just create a position of Press Relations so lazy and worthless reporters can get their daily bowl of porridge spoon fed to them. The good reporters have no need of them.

I don't think the NFL is trying to placate "the rogue press." The NFL knows it's the fans that makes this thing go, so they're trying to get the players the fans want to see & hear from in front of the media.

It's something that is negotiated & agreed upon in the CBA, so if players like Marshawn Lynch don't want to do interviews, they need to talk to their NFLPA representative & get it taken out or modified.

Until then, they need to hold up their end of the bargain & the way they are "making themselves available" should reflect poorly on the NFLPA, my opinion. If I were the NFL, I'd put pressure on the NFLPA to fix this problem instead of fining the individual players. The NFLPA obviously don't care if the NFL fines players, let's see how fast they fix it if the NFL fines the NFLPA, or hold some kind of sanctions against them.

HOU-TEX
01-30-2015, 08:59 AM
I generally agree with you about modern media. Too often they create stories from little and sensationalize things to the point of regurgitated redundancy.

All that said, the media is part of the gigantic machine that helps pump the NFL into the 10 billion dollar entertainment empire that we see today.

And what Marshawn Lynch has to understand is that his massive salaries are a direct result of that entertainment machine. The hype, gloss, and constant publicity is part of what drives that engine, and he is a direct beneficiary of it.

We all have to do things in our jobs that we dread. Why should he be excluded from a basic job requirement of an entertainment industry? 100 other players in this game understand the dynamics, so what makes him special? There is an arrogance about it that just rubs me the wrong way.

Maybe he's a great guy in real life and really believes in his charities. I don't know the man. But, like Warren Sapp said last night, why not use this international media platform to further your causes? Why not use this exposure to help those less fortunate? That's the part that doesn't make sense to me. Fine, don't like the media, but use the system to your advantage instead of being a diva and acting like you are better than everyone else. That is how he is coming across to many of us.

Of course, he has no problem in using that same media platform to push his brand. And now he's butthurt because the league could fine him for it.

Well said, DB. You're right, but the media will always drive me nuts. They tend to take something and run with it until that horse is beaten to hamburger meat. Ha

infantrycak
01-30-2015, 09:03 AM
Well said, DB. You're right, but the media will always drive me nuts. They tend to take something and run with it until that horse is beaten to hamburger meat. Ha

It's still a reflection of people/fans more than the media. If fans agreed media was flogging things too much they'd stop watching and the media would move on. That's the fallacy in blaming the media. Fans can control what remains a story - stop watching, the media is ratings driven.

Marshall
01-30-2015, 09:10 AM
I don't think the NFL is trying to placate "the rogue press." The NFL knows it's the fans that makes this thing go, so they're trying to get the players the fans want to see & hear from in front of the media.

It's something that is negotiated & agreed upon in the CBA, so if players like Marshawn Lynch don't want to do interviews, they need to talk to their NFLPA representative & get it taken out or modified.

Until then, they need to hold up their end of the bargain & the way they are "making themselves available" should reflect poorly on the NFLPA, my opinion. If I were the NFL, I'd put pressure on the NFLPA to fix this problem instead of fining the individual players. The NFLPA obviously don't care if the NFL fines players, let's see how fast they fix it if the NFL fines the NFLPA, or hold some kind of sanctions against them.

The NFLPA would never permit the organization itself to be subject to the whims of the NFL like it permits of players it purports to represent. As long as it is permitted to mitigate penalties to show players they have some value, they don't need to stand firmly behind their players. It really is almost all about the money.

infantrycak
01-30-2015, 09:30 AM
Until then, they need to hold up their end of the bargain & the way they are "making themselves available" should reflect poorly on the NFLPA, my opinion. If I were the NFL, I'd put pressure on the NFLPA to fix this problem instead of fining the individual players. The NFLPA obviously don't care if the NFL fines players, let's see how fast they fix it if the NFL fines the NFLPA, or hold some kind of sanctions against them.

The NFLPA would never permit the organization itself to be subject to the whims of the NFL like it permits of players it purports to represent. As long as it is permitted to mitigate penalties to show players they have some value, they don't need to stand firmly behind their players. It really is almost all about the money.

All this shit is contractual. The NFLPA and NFL have no contract between them. The NFL can't fine the NFLPA.

Also, it's incredibly bad policy to fine a person/entity who has no power to compel wrt the offensive conduct. The NFLPA can suggest players do things but they have no power to tell Lynch or any other player how to deal with the press.

Double Barrel
01-30-2015, 11:49 AM
It's still a reflection of people/fans more than the media. If fans agreed media was flogging things too much they'd stop watching and the media would move on. That's the fallacy in blaming the media. Fans can control what remains a story - stop watching, the media is ratings driven.

Indeed. The media is all about 'give the people what they want', which is a direct correlation to the modern news industry and its sensationalist presentation of soundbites.

I used to sort of be on Lynch's side of things when he was presented as a introverted personality that had some kind of pseudo-psychological reasoning behind his attitude with the press.

Then, I realized that's all just unadulterated B.S. and it's just an act on his part. Nothing but an act. So at that point, he's playing a game and putting himself out there for opinions.

Marshall
01-31-2015, 07:31 AM
All this shit is contractual. The NFLPA and NFL have no contract between them. The NFL can't fine the NFLPA.

Also, it's incredibly bad policy to fine a person/entity who has no power to compel wrt the offensive conduct. The NFLPA can suggest players do things but they have no power to tell Lynch or any other player how to deal with the press.

It sure is. But just like Congress exempts themselves from the laws they pass for everyone else, the NFLPA would never live under the agreement that it writes for the players nor should it. But neither should the players when it comes to things like speaking or not and that is a great failure by the NFLPA.

infantrycak
01-31-2015, 09:01 AM
But neither should the players when it comes to things like speaking or not and that is a great failure by the NFLPA.

There's no failure by the NFLPA. People are expected to speak if need be for their companies when they make $30k a year. It doesn't even have to be written into their contracts. It's do it or get fired. This bunch of whiney pissants can sure as hell spend a few minutes talking to the people who generate the billions they receive in salaries.

Norg
01-31-2015, 07:38 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MNpkSyryQz4

ObsiWan
01-31-2015, 09:14 PM
There's no failure by the NFLPA. People are expected to speak if need be for their companies when they make $30k a year. It doesn't even have to be written into their contracts. It's do it or get fired. This bunch of whiney pissants can sure as hell spend a few minutes talking to the people who generate the billions they receive in salaries.

oh come on, that's a stretch...

The $30-50K technician isn't expected to speak to the national press on behalf of his company. The 150K/yr exec might be expected to. If the tech knows something that needs to be communicated in a press release or statement to the press, he/she will brief his supervisor who will, in turn, brief the exec who will sanitize it and translate it to company speak at said press conference.

If there's a murder case that the press is covering, it's usually the precinct sgt or local chief that fields questions from the press, not the detectives doing the investigation.

regular $30K/yr Joe Schmoes don't talk to the press, their bosses do

gary
01-31-2015, 09:45 PM
Should you have to talk on T.V. if you don't want to or have to pay? I don't know. I guess so if you sign a contract which states you have to do so up front. But, on the other hand should talking on T.V. or radio be a must? There are a few ways to look at this matter. The grabbing of the crotch is what I have more of an issue with to be honest. Having met Lynch before he is very quiet and shy but he was very nice and spent some time chatting with me.

Marshall
02-01-2015, 03:28 AM
There's no failure by the NFLPA. People are expected to speak if need be for their companies when they make $30k a year. It doesn't even have to be written into their contracts. It's do it or get fired. This bunch of whiney pissants can sure as hell spend a few minutes talking to the people who generate the billions they receive in salaries.

Pot. Meet kettle.

Marshall
02-01-2015, 03:33 AM
oh come on, that's a stretch...

The $30-50K technician isn't expected to speak to the national press on behalf of his company. The 150K/yr exec might be expected to. If the tech knows something that needs to be communicated in a press release or statement to the press, he/she will brief his supervisor who will, in turn, brief the exec who will sanitize it and translate it to company speak at said press conference.

If there's a murder case that the press is covering, it's usually the precinct sgt or local chief that fields questions from the press, not the detectives doing the investigation.

regular $30K/yr Joe Schmoes don't talk to the press, their bosses do

*****

Add to the above that most corporations hire public relations personnel to deal with the press and DEMAND that all interaction with the press go through them for a variety of reasons.

Playoffs
02-01-2015, 10:31 AM
Ian Rapoport @RapSheet
On Marshawn Lynch’s looming contract extension: I’m told it’ll pay him more than $10M in 2015 & 2nd to Adrian Peterson in average-per-year

The #Seahawks have offered RB Marshawn Lynch a huge new extension, sources say. More coming on #GameDayMorning http://t.co/vu0JD2HKXo

StarStruck
02-01-2015, 12:42 PM
oh come on, that's a stretch...

The $30-50K technician isn't expected to speak to the national press on behalf of his company. The 150K/yr exec might be expected to. If the tech knows something that needs to be communicated in a press release or statement to the press, he/she will brief his supervisor who will, in turn, brief the exec who will sanitize it and translate it to company speak at said press conference.

If there's a murder case that the press is covering, it's usually the precinct sgt or local chief that fields questions from the press, not the detectives doing the investigation.

regular $30K/yr Joe Schmoes don't talk to the press, their bosses do

Absolutely! Not only does Joe Schmoe not talk to the press, but that boss better have everything filtered through Public Relations and receive the approval stamp prior to comments.

It appears that Beast Mode is a man of few words and he selectively chooses who he will speak those few words to. Some people can hate a person's guts, still smile and be engaging and some, perhaps few, won't play the game regardless of the consequences.

infantrycak
02-01-2015, 01:00 PM
Y'all are missing the point. If an ordinary employee gets told "go talk to the press" that's what he does regardless of his job description. Who does the talking is a business decision. And that's true where the press/media aren't generating 90% of the business' revenue.

StarStruck
02-01-2015, 01:04 PM
Y'all are missing the point. If an ordinary employee gets told "go talk to the press" that's what he does regardless of his job description. Who does the talking is a business decision. And that's true where the press/media aren't generating 90% of the business' revenue.

I think that I do, but we aren't talking about ordinary. I just read that Lynch was offered a contract extension.

infantrycak
02-01-2015, 01:08 PM
I think that I do, but we aren't talking about ordinary. I just read that Lynch was offered a contract extension.

No we aren't talking about ordinary. We're talking about someone who makes an extraordinary amount of money in an industry driven by media. Both weigh for him getting off his diva act and talking. Man up this actually is part of his job.

StarStruck
02-01-2015, 01:39 PM
No we aren't talking about ordinary. We're talking about someone who makes an extraordinary amount of money in an industry driven by media. Both weigh for him getting off his diva act and talking. Man up this actually is part of his job.

I respectfully disagree :). The interview that I did hear convinced me that he isn't one blessed with the gift of gab, and until he develops some level of public speaking, he would be media's poster child for side jokes. That persona could be his way of hiding his communication deficits as well.

infantrycak
02-01-2015, 01:53 PM
I respectfully disagree :). The interview that I did hear convinced me that he isn't one blessed with the gift of gab, and until he develops some level of public speaking, he would be media's poster child for side jokes. That persona could be his way of hiding his communication deficits as well.

He just voluntarily went on Conan. He's given interviews when it suits him.

Look, I'm not saying he should be drummed out of the league. Just think he's being a petulant child.

Runner
02-01-2015, 09:20 PM
He just voluntarily went on Conan. He's given interviews when it suits him.

Look, I'm not saying he should be drummed out of the league. Just think he's being a petulant child.

Marshawn Lynch, what I think...

He should have been given the ball to score the Super Bowl winning touchdown.

Worst play call I have ever seen.

infantrycak
02-01-2015, 09:30 PM
Marshawn Lynch, what I think...

He should have been given the ball to score the Super Bowl winning touchdown.

Worst play call I have ever seen.

Looks like Lynch can shorten his repeat answer.

Three downs from the one, inexcusible.

Runner
02-01-2015, 09:53 PM
Looks like Lynch can shorten his repeat answer.

Just give me the damn ball!

Or is that already taken?

Double Barrel
02-02-2015, 12:28 PM
He just voluntarily went on Conan. He's given interviews when it suits him.

Look, I'm not saying he should be drummed out of the league. Just think he's being a petulant child.

You nailed it, man. MSR

When 100+ other players in this game TOOK CARE OF BUSINESS like professional entertainers, then Lynch is just being a diva about it. All he had to do was mumble some generic answers for a few minutes and this wouldn't even be a story.

infantrycak
02-03-2015, 11:49 AM
That approach has its supporters and detractors, but Cardinals linebacker Larry Foote didn’t say whether he thought the league should continue to take a bite of Lynch’s paychecks during a Monday radio interview. Foote did say that he thought Lynch was sending the wrong message with his unwillingness to follow the rules that Foote and other players must also abide by as professional football players.

“You hear in the media, he always mentions his foundation and what he likes to do for the city of Oakland,” Foote said, via 93.7 The Fan. “I’m from the same type of urban environment that he’s from and the biggest message that he’s giving these kids, he might not want to admit it, is the hell with authority. ‘I don’t care, fine me, I’m gonna grab my crotch, I’m gonna do it my way.’ In the real world, it doesn’t work that way. It just doesn’t. How can you keep a job. I mean, you got these inner city kids, they don’t listen to teachers, they don’t listen to police officers, principals and these guys can’t even keep a job because they say ‘F’ authority.”

Foote’s point about the different ways that rules apply to different people is a sound one, even in the NFL. Lynch’s behavior is tolerated because he’s one of the best running backs in the league, but a lesser player would likely get less rope from their own team if they were unwilling to deal with parts of their job they don’t like. That’s even more true when you move out of the realm of NFL sports and into less glamorous professions.

Link (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/02/03/larry-foote-marshawn-lynchs-to-hell-with-authority-approach-sends-bad-message/)

Playoffs
02-04-2015, 01:21 PM
Adam Schefter @AdamSchefter
Also no fine for hat Marshawn Lynch wore at media sessions, which was made by and given to him by NFL licensee, New Era, and was team colors

Marshawn Lynch complied w/ obligations to attend media sessions at Super Bowl and will not be fined, per NFL spokesman Michael Signora.

ObsiWan
02-04-2015, 01:37 PM
Adam Schefter @AdamSchefter

yeah, but you'll have a tough time convincing me that his butthead act didn't cost him a chance to score the winning TD.
:tinfoil:
How much is that worth?

Mollywhopper
02-04-2015, 02:35 PM
Interesting that anyone would think that Carroll was convinced Marshawn would absolutely go down before the end zone on the play before.

Double Barrel
02-04-2015, 03:13 PM
yeah, but you'll have a tough time convincing me that his butthead act didn't cost him a chance to score the winning TD.
:tinfoil:
How much is that worth?

I don't buy it. In that moment to win another Super Bowl, I simply cannot believe that the head coach and OC were concerned about anything other than winning that game.

I heard a stat that Lynch had been given the ball five times last season a yard from the goal-line. In those five attempts, he got one TD. There is no guarantee that the Patriots defense would have let him in. We see epic goal-line stands all the time in football.

ObsiWan
02-04-2015, 06:17 PM
I don't buy it. In that moment to win another Super Bowl, I simply cannot believe that the head coach and OC were concerned about anything other than winning that game.

I heard a stat that Lynch had been given the ball five times last season a yard from the goal-line. In those five attempts, he got one TD. There is no guarantee that the Patriots defense would have let him in. We see epic goal-line stands all the time in football.

So you think the pass play was the better option?

steelbtexan
02-04-2015, 06:55 PM
I generally agree with you about modern media. Too often they create stories from little and sensationalize things to the point of regurgitated redundancy.

All that said, the media is part of the gigantic machine that helps pump the NFL into the 10 billion dollar entertainment empire that we see today.

And what Marshawn Lynch has to understand is that his massive salaries are a direct result of that entertainment machine. The hype, gloss, and constant publicity is part of what drives that engine, and he is a direct beneficiary of it.

We all have to do things in our jobs that we dread. Why should he be excluded from a basic job requirement of an entertainment industry? 100 other players in this game understand the dynamics, so what makes him special? There is an arrogance about it that just rubs me the wrong way.

Maybe he's a great guy in real life and really believes in his charities. I don't know the man. But, like Warren Sapp said last night, why not use this international media platform to further your causes? Why not use this exposure to help those less fortunate? That's the part that doesn't make sense to me. Fine, don't like the media, but use the system to your advantage instead of being a diva and acting like you are better than everyone else. That is how he is coming across to many of us.

Of course, he has no problem in using that same media platform to push his brand. And now he's butthurt because the league could fine him for it.

And he's looking for a contract extention.

Which he will probably receive.

Playoffs
02-04-2015, 07:18 PM
So you think the pass play was the better option?

No, I hated the call...

But those anti-Lynch conspiracy theories are off the wall, man.

There's an adage coaches have, players, not plays -- meaning go with your best guys, not your trickiest play. A lesson even pro-level coaches have to learn and learn again. Some in league circles felt one of Bevell's weaknesses was he tended to outsmart himself. This was being bandied about in the media during the season. SEA takes a lot of chances, this one didn't work. It happens.

ObsiWan
02-04-2015, 07:32 PM
No, I hated the call...

But those anti-Lynch conspiracy theories are off the wall, man.


I know. But GP (he may be before your time) isn't here any more to do his :tinfoil: thing any more so I thought I'd give it a shot.

And to be honest, that DB made a damned good play. He had made another earlier in the 4th when he broke up a deep throw with an equally outstanding play.

Like you say, Carroll rolled the dice and lost. I would have used my sledgehammer.

Playoffs
02-04-2015, 07:42 PM
I know. But GP (he may be before your time) isn't here any more to do his :tinfoil: thing any more so I thought I'd give it a shot.


Okay, cool. Didn't "sound" like you... guess I missed the sarc.

ObsiWan
02-04-2015, 10:34 PM
Okay, cool. Didn't "sound" like you... guess I missed the sarc.

forgot the sign
:sarcasm:

Double Barrel
02-05-2015, 09:51 AM
So you think the pass play was the better option?

It really wasn't a bad call if you're objective about it. Teams make that TD 9 out of 10 times.

If the outside WR had jumped off the ball at the snap and pushed his defender back a little quicker, Butler would not have had the chance.

In the end, the defense just made a great play. It's as simple as that. I cannot crucify Carroll for a call that many pro coaches are saying was solid in the big picture.

What if they had given it to Lynch and he fumbled? People would be screaming "why didn't they pass it on 2nd down?!!!". You cannot win when you lose like that.

eriadoc
02-05-2015, 10:04 AM
It really wasn't a bad call if you're objective about it.

It was a bad call IMO for two reasons:

1.) It's a lower percentage call than other options available to them, irrespective of run or pass. A pass play in itself wasn't a bad call, but they could have done a WR screen, a shuttle pass, a pass from a bootleg (read option or not), or a pass to the back of the end zone (fade or otherwise). While the latter might be a lower success percentage, it is also a lower risk, IMO. How often do you see a fade intercepted?

2.) It completely neutered the best skills of their play-making QB. Wilson is intelligent and mobile. They removed any post-snap decision making by him with that play call. The decision was made pre-snap and the execution happened with no post-snap decision because of the type of play and speed with which it needed to be ran. Furthermore, they removed any threat of Wilson running or moving the defense with his mobility with that play call. A bootleg, read option, or even a dropback giving him the option to read the defense and take off if called for would have been a better call, IMO.

We always hear about how important a QB is in the NFL. Well, Carroll removed the QB from the equation with that call, at least beyond the point that any basic QB could make that throw. Put the ball in the hands of your playmakers with the game on the line.

gary
02-05-2015, 10:11 AM
Even if I give the ball to one of my two best players either Lynch or Wilson then at least I know I gave my team the best chance to win the SB.

Double Barrel
02-05-2015, 10:48 AM
It was a bad call IMO for two reasons:

1.) It's a lower percentage call than other options available to them, irrespective of run or pass. A pass play in itself wasn't a bad call, but they could have done a WR screen, a shuttle pass, a pass from a bootleg (read option or not), or a pass to the back of the end zone (fade or otherwise). While the latter might be a lower success percentage, it is also a lower risk, IMO. How often do you see a fade intercepted?

2.) It completely neutered the best skills of their play-making QB. Wilson is intelligent and mobile. They removed any post-snap decision making by him with that play call. The decision was made pre-snap and the execution happened with no post-snap decision because of the type of play and speed with which it needed to be ran. Furthermore, they removed any threat of Wilson running or moving the defense with his mobility with that play call. A bootleg, read option, or even a dropback giving him the option to read the defense and take off if called for would have been a better call, IMO.

We always hear about how important a QB is in the NFL. Well, Carroll removed the QB from the equation with that call, at least beyond the point that any basic QB could make that throw. Put the ball in the hands of your playmakers with the game on the line.

You make good points, man, but, but the same token, NFLN ran stats and that has been a bread-and-butter play for Wilson for awhile.

And maybe that's the problem. A football genius like Belichick picked up on that tendency and taught his rookie CB well. Butler acted on instinct as he had been trained in practice.

Wilson could have changed it at the line, though. He felt confident enough that he could make that play. He said after the game that he never saw Butler.

I'm telling you, if that other WR had done his job, Butler would not have been in position to make the play. Players have to *ahem* execute.

I'm not saying it was a great call. But, I'm also not on the landslide of opinion saying it's "the worst call in the history of the NFL". I'm not one for bandwagon hyperbole, but rather I form my own takes based on analysis. Bad call because it did not work out. But let's be honest, if they had scored, not one mofo would have called it a bad playcall.

eriadoc
02-05-2015, 10:52 AM
Bad call because it did not work out. But let's be honest, if they had scored, not one mofo would have called it a bad playcall.

Meh, maybe. But when it first happened, I didn't know it was intercepted. Thought it was just knocked down. As the pass came out of his hands, I was yelling "idiot!"

So maybe it's just me. I personally had predicted a read option with Wilson making the decision in real time.

Playoffs
02-05-2015, 11:03 AM
...As the pass came out of his hands, I was yelling "idiot!"...

As was I, "They're gonna pass... they're gonna pass... no!"

Speedy
02-05-2015, 11:03 AM
It really wasn't a bad call if you're objective about it. Teams make that TD 9 out of 10 times.

If the outside WR had jumped off the ball at the snap and pushed his defender back a little quicker, Butler would not have had the chance.

In the end, the defense just made a great play. It's as simple as that. I cannot crucify Carroll for a call that many pro coaches are saying was solid in the big picture.

What if they had given it to Lynch and he fumbled? People would be screaming "why didn't they pass it on 2nd down?!!!". You cannot win when you lose like that.

This call isn't much different than the Texans deciding to pass on 3rd and 2 in OT in the Dallas game, instead of giving it to Foster who had just picked up 30 yards on 2 carries in that drive, and had 157 yards at a 6.8 yard per carry clip for the day. IIRC, no one thought the Texans passing in that situation was a good call.

I get that the play (Seattle) in and of itself is not a bad play, and if you run it any other time during the game, fine. And I get that that play would likely work 8 out of 10 times. But when the game is on the line and you need that TD to win it, or that 1st down to keep an OT drive alive, you've got to play to your strengths. For me, it's as simple as that.

For the Texans, you win or lose that game against Dallas with Foster, not on the arm of Fitzpatrick. For Seattle, you win or lose with Lynch, or even Wilson, running - their strength - not their pass game.

And if they gave it to Lynch and he was stopped, I doubt anybody would be screaming why didn't they pass. You don't get 2nd guessed when you play to your strength. You get 2nd guessed when you gamble and play away from your strength.

Playoffs
02-05-2015, 11:18 AM
As was I, "They're gonna pass... they're gonna pass... no!"

I should also say I'm taking the 3 points before the half instead of going for the TD with 6 seconds left. Different strokes.

thunderkyss
02-05-2015, 11:19 AM
You make good points, man, but, but the same token, NFLN ran stats and that has been a bread-and-butter play for Wilson for awhile.

And maybe that's the problem. A football genius like Belichick picked up on that tendency and taught his rookie CB well. Butler acted on instinct as he had been trained in practice.

Wilson could have changed it at the line, though. He felt confident enough that he could make that play. He said after the game that he never saw Butler.

I'm telling you, if that other WR had done his job, Butler would not have been in position to make the play. Players have to *ahem* execute.

I'm not saying it was a great call. But, I'm also not on the landslide of opinion saying it's "the worst call in the history of the NFL". I'm not one for bandwagon hyperbole, but rather I form my own takes based on analysis. Bad call because it did not work out. But let's be honest, if they had scored, not one mofo would have called it a bad playcall.


Agreed. I understand the, "You hand it to beastmode three times" group, but I can understand Carroll expecting Wilson to make good decisions throughout the process. He looks at the defense & sees the cover he wants against the routes they have called. He gets a good look at his target, at a quick glance, it looks like a safe throw, or you'd get that penalty with Browner mugging Kearse with the ball in the air.

It didn't even look like it was going to be close, looked like it was going to be an easy score, but Butler made a heck of a play.

Bad call, maybe. Worst in a Super Bowl, doubt it. Worst in history, not even close.

thunderkyss
02-05-2015, 11:20 AM
This call isn't much different than the Texans deciding to pass on 3rd and 2 in OT in the Dallas game, instead of giving it to Foster who had just picked up 30 yards on 2 carries in that drive, and had 157 yards at a 6.8 yard per carry clip for the day. IIRC, no one thought the Texans passing in that situation was a good call.


That call was even worse, because we didn't even line Foster up in the backfield to fake the run.

JCTexan
02-05-2015, 11:23 AM
Meh, maybe. But when it first happened, I didn't know it was intercepted. Thought it was just knocked down. As the pass came out of his hands, I was yelling "idiot!"

So maybe it's just me. I personally had predicted a read option with Wilson making the decision in real time.

As was I, "They're gonna pass... they're gonna pass... no!"

I wasn't yelling at my TV but a pass in that situation surprised the hell out of me. I was thinking run all the way. Pete Carrol tried to be the smartest man in the room and it cost him the Super Bowl.

HOU-TEX
02-05-2015, 11:24 AM
Even if I give the ball to one of my two best players either Lynch or Wilson then at least I know I gave my team the best chance to win the SB.

I agree, Gary.

JCTexan
02-05-2015, 11:28 AM
That call was even worse, because we didn't even line Foster up in the backfield to fake the run.

Seattle had Lynch in the backfield but they didn't fake the run. Everybody assumed Lynch would get the ball there and Seattle didn't utilize him at all. Even a play-action would have set up the pass better.

Mollywhopper
02-05-2015, 11:35 AM
I wasn't yelling at my TV but a pass in that situation surprised the hell out of me. I was thinking run all the way. Pete Carrol tried to be the smartest man in the room and it cost him the Super Bowl.

Malcolm Butler making the play of his life cost them the Super Bowl, not that play call itself. I'm not sure why that gets lost on just about everyone.

eriadoc
02-05-2015, 11:38 AM
Malcolm Butler making the play of his life cost them the Super Bowl, not that play call itself. I'm not sure why that gets lost on just about everyone.

Because there were better play call options that would have made it extremely difficult and unlikely that Butler or any other Patriot could make such a play.

ObsiWan
02-05-2015, 11:40 AM
Agreed. I understand the, "You hand it to beastmode three times" group, but I can understand Carroll expecting Wilson to make good decisions throughout the process. He looks at the defense & sees the cover he wants against the routes they have called. He gets a good look at his target, at a quick glance, it looks like a safe throw, or you'd get that penalty with Browner mugging Kearse with the ball in the air.

It didn't even look like it was going to be close, looked like it was going to be an easy score, but Butler made a heck of a play.

Bad call, maybe. Worst in a Super Bowl, doubt it. Worst in history, not even close.

Looking at it calmly (took 3 days to get here), I think the flaw in that play was sending Lynch out wide to the left.
http://urbynloft.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/super-bowl-play.jpg

If he had remained next to Wilson, then the defense would have had to respect the possibility of a draw or delay. The indecision or moment to read whether it was a delay or not would have probably held the DB and kept him from jumping the route. With Lynch way out on the left all they had to do was cover the pass.

JCTexan
02-05-2015, 11:45 AM
Malcolm Butler making the play of his life cost them the Super Bowl, not that play call itself. I'm not sure why that gets lost on just about everyone.

You're right. That great play by Butler won the Patriots the Super Bowl. I don't think the Patriots would have stopped Lynch from the 1 on two running plays though.

Mollywhopper
02-05-2015, 11:49 AM
Because there were better play call options that would have made it extremely difficult and unlikely that Butler or any other Patriot could make such a play.

That's all completely hypothetical. Other play calls would have had their own thousands of other possible permutations.

The only thing anyone can say definitively is Butler made a tremendous play and it sealed the game for his team.

infantrycak
02-05-2015, 11:51 AM
Malcolm Butler making the play of his life cost them the Super Bowl, not that play call itself. I'm not sure why that gets lost on just about everyone.

Because you can't say the bold.

It's not an either or proposition. Both can be true.

steelbtexan
02-05-2015, 12:00 PM
That's all completely hypothetical. Other play calls would have had their own thousands of other possible permutations.

The only thing anyone can say definitively is Butler made a tremendous play and it sealed the game for his team.

Permutations? Awesome

Word of the day worthy.

Double Barrel
02-05-2015, 12:18 PM
This call isn't much different than the Texans deciding to pass on 3rd and 2 in OT in the Dallas game, instead of giving it to Foster who had just picked up 30 yards on 2 carries in that drive, and had 157 yards at a 6.8 yard per carry clip for the day. IIRC, no one thought the Texans passing in that situation was a good call.

I get that the play (Seattle) in and of itself is not a bad play, and if you run it any other time during the game, fine. And I get that that play would likely work 8 out of 10 times. But when the game is on the line and you need that TD to win it, or that 1st down to keep an OT drive alive, you've got to play to your strengths. For me, it's as simple as that.

For the Texans, you win or lose that game against Dallas with Foster, not on the arm of Fitzpatrick. For Seattle, you win or lose with Lynch, or even Wilson, running - their strength - not their pass game.

And if they gave it to Lynch and he was stopped, I doubt anybody would be screaming why didn't they pass. You don't get 2nd guessed when you play to your strength. You get 2nd guessed when you gamble and play away from your strength.

Great analysis. Like you said, at any other time in the game, the call was solid.

Seeing all the sideline talk that NFL Films is showing is clearly reveals that Carroll had absolute confidence in his QB to make that play. He even made a comment to Wilson that they were giving him an easy one with three TOs and a minute left on the clock. I don't think it every crossed Carroll's mind that the Patriots could have that play figured out like they did.

As far as the last point, Carroll said there was going to be a pass on at least one of those three plays. They had to stop the clock. I think their mentality was if they ran on 2nd and got stopped, they'd have to use the timeout. Then passing on 3rd is obvious, because they need to stop the clock.

With as much confidence as Carroll had in his QB and team, there had to be a little seed of doubt with that mentality. They were trying to think two steps ahead if the Patriots had stopped them instead of going all in for the play.

Agreed. I understand the, "You hand it to beastmode three times" group, but I can understand Carroll expecting Wilson to make good decisions throughout the process. He looks at the defense & sees the cover he wants against the routes they have called. He gets a good look at his target, at a quick glance, it looks like a safe throw, or you'd get that penalty with Browner mugging Kearse with the ball in the air.

It didn't even look like it was going to be close, looked like it was going to be an easy score, but Butler made a heck of a play.

Bad call, maybe. Worst in a Super Bowl, doubt it. Worst in history, not even close.

I definitely understand the "hand it to Beastmode three times" folks. Like everyone else, I was surprised they threw the ball when it happened. Like you said, thought, Carroll thought they had the right play for that specific defense, and they were 99% correct. It was that 1% chance with Butler jumping on the ball that made all the difference.

Looking at it calmly (took 3 days to get here), I think the flaw in that play was sending Lynch out wide to the left.
http://urbynloft.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/super-bowl-play.jpg

If he had remained next to Wilson, then the defense would have had to respect the possibility of a draw or delay. The indecision or moment to read whether it was a delay or not would have probably held the DB and kept him from jumping the route. With Lynch way out on the left all they had to do was cover the pass.

Great screen grab. When you see that point when Wilson was about to release, you can see why he thought he had the play. It's almost wide open field and never saw Butler breaking on it.

For me, I just credit Butler and his coaching more than I criticize the playcall. It was a bang-bang play and truly an epic way to end the game for the Patriots.

Mollywhopper
02-05-2015, 12:31 PM
Because you can't say the bold.

It's not an either or proposition. Both can be true.

The play call itself having more possible outcomes than what happened allows me to say it wasn't necessarily what cost them. I can definitively point at happened directly, Butler's outstanding break on the ball and the result. Credit where it's due in lieu of "the worst call in all of the history of the word call".

ObsiWan
02-05-2015, 12:37 PM
You don't get 2nd guessed when you play to your strength. You get 2nd guessed when you gamble and play away from your strength.

Well put.

Repped
:tiphat:

infantrycak
02-05-2015, 12:46 PM
The play call itself having more possible outcomes than what happened allows me to say it wasn't necessarily what cost them.

This can be said of every play ever called and therefore is meaningless.

Playcalling is subject to criticism regardless of the outcome of the play called. Even if Butler hadn't made the play and the Seahawks had gotten a TD it wouldn't make the call any better.

In 4 years in the league on 3 teams including the WR poor Seahawks Lockette had failed to make himself a factor in ordinary play. That's not who you go to with the SB on the line.

Playoffs
02-05-2015, 12:58 PM
...I think the flaw in that play was sending Lynch out wide to the left.

If he had remained next to Wilson, then the defense would have had to respect the possibility of a draw or delay. The indecision or moment to read whether it was a delay or not would have probably held the DB and kept him from jumping the route. With Lynch way out on the left all they had to do was cover the pass.

Why? Jumping the route moves the DB directly towards the QB and RB next to him. For Butler, he'd be defending the pass and running towards Lynch.

Belichick had seen the formation, knew the tendencies, and specifically practiced against it telling Brown what he had to do. The defensive alignment set up the play call.

I think the flaw was putting the ball at risk. Carroll said he wanted to waste a play or something similar. Throw to a boundary, throw it away, don't throw into a crowd. Go with your best guy.

infantrycak
02-05-2015, 01:05 PM
Go with your best guy.

Of 40 rushing and receiving TDs this season, Lynch & Wilson had 23 with no receiver other than Lynch (4) having more than 3.

Double Barrel
02-05-2015, 01:06 PM
I've got nothing more to add, but GREAT DISCUSSION, guys! This kind of open, respectful dialogue is what makes Texans Talk so freakin' great. Seriously, when everyone else in your life is tired of hearing you babble on about football, you can always come to this forum to find others that never get tired of it! :)

Mollywhopper
02-05-2015, 01:15 PM
This can be said of every play ever called and therefore is meaningless.

Playcalling is subject to criticism regardless of the outcome of the play called. Even if Butler hadn't made the play and the Seahawks had gotten a TD it wouldn't make the call any better.

In 4 years in the league on 3 teams including the WR poor Seahawks Lockette had failed to make himself a factor in ordinary play. That's not who you go to with the SB on the line.

Criticize it. Judge it against alternatives. That's all very fair. But saying it did cost them the game doesn't point an accurate finger. Not like the one I can point to with the one outcome we got. I can say Butler made the play. The rest is conjecture.

ObsiWan
02-05-2015, 01:17 PM
Why? Jumping the route moves the DB directly towards the QB and RB next to him. For Butler, he'd be defending the pass and running towards Lynch.

Belichick had seen the formation, knew the tendencies, and specifically practiced against it telling Brown what he had to do. The defensive alignment set up the play call.

I think the flaw was putting the ball at risk. Carroll said he wanted to waste a play or something similar. Throw to a boundary, throw it away, don't throw into a crowd. Go with your best guy.

yeah... can't argue that at all.

JB
02-05-2015, 01:25 PM
I've got nothing more to add, but GREAT DISCUSSION, guys! This kind of open, respectful dialogue is what makes Texans Talk so freakin' great. Seriously, when everyone else in your life is tired of hearing you babble on about football, you can always come to this forum to find others that never get tired of it! :)

Yep!

:fans:

Mr teX
02-05-2015, 01:31 PM
This can be said of every play ever called and therefore is meaningless.

Playcalling is subject to criticism regardless of the outcome of the play called. Even if Butler hadn't made the play and the Seahawks had gotten a TD it wouldn't make the call any better.

In 4 years in the league on 3 teams including the WR poor Seahawks Lockette had failed to make himself a factor in ordinary play. That's not who you go to with the SB on the line.

That's all that needs to be said. Your 2 best players are Wilson and Lynch and the ball shouldn't be put in anyone else's hands but theirs. The zone read was the way to go....If you insist on throwing it there, you throw it off a zone read fake. Even if Lynch doesn't get in on that play, you've got a TO.

It was an atrocious call

Playoffs
02-05-2015, 01:43 PM
I should also say I'm taking the 3 points before the half instead of going for the TD with 6 seconds left. Different strokes.

With six seconds left in the first half, the Seahawks had the ball at the Patriots’ 11-yard line. Some coaches would have simply kicked a field goal right there, worrying that if they ran another offensive play, it would result in a turnover or would take all six seconds off the clock, and they’d come away empty-handed. In fact, NFL Films microphones captured Carroll and Wilson talking during the timeout right before that play, and it sounded like Carroll was considering sending in his field goal team right then and there, before Wilson talked him out of it.

“I want to throw that back shoulder ball,” Wilson said of the pass he wanted to throw into the end zone on the next play.

“Russ, we have points right now, OK?” Carroll replied, suggesting that maybe they should just take the three points and go into the locker room at halftime.

Wilson answered: “I know. I’m gonna throw that back shoulder.”
http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/02/05/wilson-convinced-carroll-to-be-aggressive-before-halftime/

JCTexan
02-05-2015, 05:47 PM
As far as the last point, Carroll said there was going to be a pass on at least one of those three plays. They had to stop the clock. I think their mentality was if they ran on 2nd and got stopped, they'd have to use the timeout. Then passing on 3rd is obvious, because they need to stop the clock.

If utilized correctly the clock would not have been a factor with the three play calls. Seattle let forty seconds run off the clock after their first down run. Seattle could have called three running plays and there still could have been 15-20 seconds remaining in the game. They didn't want to give Brady the ball with 45+ seconds left.

Double Barrel
02-05-2015, 06:11 PM
If utilized correctly the clock would not have been a factor with the three play calls. Seattle let forty seconds run off the clock after their first down run. Seattle could have called three running plays and there still could have been 15-20 seconds remaining in the game. They didn't want to give Brady the ball with 45+ seconds left.

yeah, you're right about that. I kept wondering why Belichick didn't call a TO, but figured he'd had enough in past SB losses of giving the other team time to figure things out. He left it in the hands of his D, which ended up being the right decision in the end.

Speaking of Belichick and that Seahawks playcalling:

Belichick defends Seahawks' play call (http://espn.go.com/boston/nfl/story/_/id/12277589/criticism-seattle-seahawks-play-call-line-bill-belichick-new-england-patriots-says)

He's saying what a lot of coaches have said, but then again, they do not tend to question their own while still in the profession.

Playoffs
03-01-2015, 02:47 PM
Lynch had been mostly silent on the topic -- until Ismail Senol entered the equation.

"To be honest with you, I would be lying if I didn't tell you that I was expecting the ball," Lynch said. "Yes, I was expecting the ball. But in life, these things happen. Like I told a reporter after the game, it's a team sport."

Lynch didn't put the blame on Carroll, though his ensuing explanation left plenty of room for interpretation.

"I had no problem with the decision of the playcalling. I think it was more of a ... how do I say this? When you look at me, and you let me run that ball in ... I am the face of the nation," he said. "You know, MVP of the Super Bowl, that's pretty much the face of the nation at that point of time. I don't know what went into that call. I mean, maybe it was a good thing that I didn't get the ball. I mean, you know, it cost us the Super Bowl. I have full confidence in my teammates to execute that plan because we've done it so many more times. But would I love to had the ball there? Yeah, I would have.

"But the game is over, and I'm in Turkey."

He's "chatty Cathy" here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79zQ0TL1vmI

Double Barrel
03-02-2015, 11:22 AM
He's "chatty Cathy" here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79zQ0TL1vmI

http://www.awesomecooltees.com/products/6853674.png

He seems to be insinuating that his number wasn't called because of some type of concerns about him being SB MVP. Yet, he had the ball the play before and could have scored, and he most likely would have gotten the ball 1-2 more times on that drive if the Patriots had not intercepted it.

Playoffs
03-02-2015, 11:31 AM
He seems to be insinuating that his number wasn't called because of some type of concerns about him being SB MVP...

Yeah, that's why I posted it...

PC: What play do you want to go with?

DB: Let's go with #24.

PC: We can't let Marshawn score here... he'll be Super Bowl MVP... he wears the wrong shoes and those gold headphones... and he doesn't interview well!

Playoffs
03-06-2015, 03:48 PM
Seahawks re-sign Marshawn Lynch (http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/12434646/marshawn-lynch-re-sign-seattle-seahawks)
Seattle Seahawks RB Marshawn Lynch has decided to return to the NFL and has agreed to a new contract with the Seahawks, a source told ESPN NFL Insider Adam Schefter.

Marshawn Lynch plans to re-sign with the Seahawks on a one-year deal, according to a source.
The one-year deal is worth $11 million, including a $1 million base salary, a $9 million signing bonus and a $1 million roster bonus, a source told ESPN's John Clayton.

ObsiWan
03-06-2015, 07:08 PM
Seahawks re-sign Marshawn Lynch (http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/12434646/marshawn-lynch-re-sign-seattle-seahawks)

Where did you get those figures? None are mentioned in the linked article.
:mcnugget:

infantrycak
03-06-2015, 07:11 PM
Where did you get those figures? None are mentioned in the linked article.
:mcnugget:

That's Clayton's spin. It's a 3 year deal 12 guaranteed in the form of 4.5 1st year salary and 7.5 signing bonus. There is speculation the Seahawks have a wink agreement not to seek repayment of the signing bonus if he retires next year.

That's according to profootballtalk.

ObsiWan
03-06-2015, 07:15 PM
That's Clayton's spin. It's a 3 year deal 12 guaranteed in the form of 4.5 1st year salary and 7.5 signing bonus. There is speculation the Seahawks have a wink agreement not to seek repayment of the signing bonus if he retires next year.

That's according to profootballtalk.

Thanks.