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View Full Version : Report: Terrell Owens suing former agent Drew Rosenhaus


Blake
08-23-2013, 11:43 AM
http://tracking.si.com/2013/08/22/terrell-owens-drew-rosenhaus-suing-lawsuit/?sct=hp_t2_a15&eref=sihp

“Terrell trusted [Drew] Rosenhaus when he recommended that Terrell hire Rubin as his financial adviser,” Owens’ attorneys, Curtis Carlson and Chase Carlson of Miami-based Carlson & Lewittes, P.A., said in a statement to Yahoo.
“It is completely ridiculous that Rosenhaus would refer a five-time Pro Bowler to a financial advisor who has been accused of stealing from his clients in the past, whose college degree was in Exercise Science, and who was inexperienced. Rosenhaus should have steered Terrell away from Rubin, not toward him.”


Maybe someone can answer me this. Why do players trust investment bankers or anyone who plays the stock market with their millions? Can we agree that the risk of losing it all either from bad stocks or crooked investors is not worth the promissed ROA? Just put your money in some CD's and stay fat and happy. I dont get it.

paycheck71
08-23-2013, 11:49 AM
http://tracking.si.com/2013/08/22/terrell-owens-drew-rosenhaus-suing-lawsuit/?sct=hp_t2_a15&eref=sihp


Maybe someone can answer me this. Why do players trust investment bankers or anyone who plays the stock market with their millions? Can we agree that the risk of losing it all either from bad stocks or crooked investors is not worth the promissed ROA? Just put your money in some CD's and stay fat and happy. I dont get it.

You can invest SAFELY and make your 10-15% annual return, or you can look to double and triple your money quickly and lose it all. That's the difference.

eriadoc
08-23-2013, 11:51 AM
Maybe someone can answer me this. Why do players trust investment bankers or anyone who plays the stock market with their millions? Can we agree that the risk of losing it all either from bad stocks or crooked investors is not worth the promissed ROA? Just put your money in some CD's and stay fat and happy. I dont get it.

I don't disagree with that, but looking at it from the other side:

These guys aren't rocket scientists. Even smart people get caught in financial chicanery. These guys are coddled their whole lives, told they're the greatest thing since sliced bread, and then handed millions of dollars (some of them). The NFL and various mentors int he NFL community tell these guys to prepare for life after football and invest their money, but there doesn't appear to be any real assistance in that area. So these players lean on their closest advisors - in this case, his agent. In other cases, maybe they lean on their uncle to get them a good contract. There are predators out there looking for an easy kill, so to speak.

The smart ones invest in a ton of pizza delivery restaurants just months before pot is legalized. :D

thunderkyss
08-23-2013, 12:53 PM
Maybe someone can answer me this. Why do players trust investment bankers or anyone who plays the stock market with their millions? Can we agree that the risk of losing it all either from bad stocks or crooked investors is not worth the promissed ROA? Just put your money in some CD's and stay fat and happy. I dont get it.

Because that doesn't make sense.

Especially when we're talking about the kind of money these guys have, managing their investments is a full time job.

StarStruck
08-23-2013, 12:56 PM
I have been watching the program American Greed: Scams, Scoundrels and Suckers that's on CNBC. There have been people more educated and wealthier than TO and have been ruined financially. Some of these people are really good and the line didn't stop with the arrests of Sanford and Maadorf (possibly sp).

One of the interesting things to me is that many will pay the great dividends for a year and sometimes more and give the investors the confidence to invest more, then the advisors began to live really well while paying the old investors with some of the new investors money until the scheme crashes. Usually the only scammed investors that got some or all of their money back were those whose advisors were linked with reputable financial institutions who had their reputations on the line. But if these advisors are independent, those from the very wealthy, those who invest for their children's future education or retirees trying to live comfortably for the rest of their lives are sunk.

True, CDs are safe, but most investors want to make more on their money than 1 or 2 percent. What was safe years ago and someone could still get 6 or 7 percent in CDs and money markets no longer exists.

2012Champs
08-23-2013, 02:34 PM
You can invest SAFELY and make your 10-15% annual return, or you can look to double and triple your money quickly and lose it all. That's the difference.



You can not say that "You can safely make 10-15% annual return" that is false or at the very least very misleading

2012Champs
08-23-2013, 02:36 PM
I have been watching the program American Greed: Scams, Scoundrels and Suckers that's on CNBC. There have been people more educated and wealthier than TO and have been ruined financially. Some of these people are really good and the line didn't stop with the arrests of Sanford and Maadorf (possibly sp).

One of the interesting things to me is that many will pay the great dividends for a year and sometimes more and give the investors the confidence to invest more, then the advisors began to live really well while paying the old investors with some of the new investors money until the scheme crashes. Usually the only scammed investors that got some or all of their money back were those whose advisors were linked with reputable financial institutions who had their reputations on the line. But if these advisors are independent, those from the very wealthy, those who invest for their children's future education or retirees trying to live comfortably for the rest of their lives are sunk.

True, CDs are safe, but most investors want to make more on their money than 1 or 2 percent. What was safe years ago and someone could still get 6 or 7 percent in CDs and money markets no longer exists.




I watch the show a lot and 9/10 there are many signs the investors should see well in advance that should tell you to run.

2012Champs
08-23-2013, 02:42 PM
Unlike most of these "advisors" Jeff Rubin was registered with FINRA and has been since banned from the industry. He had numerous customer complaints and issues which are a matter of public record and TO or any invester should look up their "advisor" to see what issues they might have had in the past. Rubin's complaints date back to 2004

Double Barrel
08-23-2013, 03:52 PM
I guess I have my grandparent's attitude about these kinds of things. The old saying about "a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush " comes to mind.

If you're making millions, why risk it? Why not go to a reputable bank and keep it safe. How much freakin' money do you really need to live a good life? Why get greedy with something that you worked your ass of to earn with any kind of risk?

I just don't get the blind trust, I guess. If I ever had that kind of money, I'd be avoiding stupid purchase decisions and keep my money in several places backed by the FDIC.

And I'm sure there are a lot of pro athletes that do just that thing, but they are not sensational stories, so we never hear about them.

2012Champs
08-23-2013, 04:35 PM
I guess I have my grandparent's attitude about these kinds of things. The old saying about "a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush " comes to mind.

If you're making millions, why risk it? Why not go to a reputable bank and keep it safe. How much freakin' money do you really need to live a good life? Why get greedy with something that you worked your ass of to earn with any kind of risk?

I just don't get the blind trust, I guess. If I ever had that kind of money, I'd be avoiding stupid purchase decisions and keep my money in several places backed by the FDIC.

And I'm sure there are a lot of pro athletes that do just that thing, but they are not sensational stories, so we never hear about them.




Sticking with FDIC insured products equals a guaranteed loss over time. Setting up a diversified investment plan isn't all that hard but at the end of the day you should fully understand what you own.

On the finra site it details a complaint against this guy by a "nfl athlete" where over 3 million of the clients total 3.5 million in assets was invested into 4 highly illiquid (meaning it doesn't trade much) equity names that's too heavy to anyone who is paying attention. Everyone in this case has blame

Vinny
08-23-2013, 05:05 PM
T Owens blew money like he thought it was a river of endless cash. Now its time to sue someone when the ride ends.

Playoffs
08-23-2013, 05:06 PM
Maybe someone can answer me this. Why do players trust investment bankers or anyone who plays the stock market with their millions? Can we agree that the risk of losing it all either from bad stocks or crooked investors is not worth the promissed ROA? Just put your money in some CD's and stay fat and happy. I dont get it.
Because vultures circle over those with new money and/or those uneducated on how to keep their money. And earning bank interest/CDs or putting it under a mattress is not the way to do it.

Vinny
08-23-2013, 05:08 PM
Because vultures circle over those with new money and/or those uneducated on how to keep their money. And earning bank interest/CDs or putting it under a mattress is not the way to do it.

or just calls it pimpin' to make it easy.

2012Champs
08-23-2013, 05:09 PM
T Owens blew money like he thought it was a river of endless cash. Now its time to sue someone when the ride ends.

While that may be largely true it looks like his advisor was pretty shady and doing stuff he knew was wrong to put more into his own pocket

paycheck71
08-23-2013, 05:19 PM
Because vultures circle over those with new money and/or those uneducated on how to keep their money. And earning bank interest/CDs or putting it under a mattress is not the way to do it.

Exactly. And you don't even have to put it under the mattress/CD's/bank interest to be safe. Greed comes into play here, where some of these athletes give their money to people who promise them ridiculous ROI that carries unreasonable risk.

Blake
08-23-2013, 05:21 PM
Because that doesn't make sense.

Especially when we're talking about the kind of money these guys have, managing their investments is a full time job.

Haha ok TK. I forgot that if you have millions you must risk it in the stock market or it goes away. Thanks for the reminder.

Double Barrel
08-23-2013, 05:28 PM
Sticking with FDIC insured products equals a guaranteed loss over time. Setting up a diversified investment plan isn't all that hard but at the end of the day you should fully understand what you own.

Please explain. If I deposit a million dollars into an account insured by FDIC, it will be less than a million in the future? Even if I don't withdraw any of it?

All I know is that my in-laws are very conservative with their money. All their friends were multi-millionaires, but after the crash a few years ago, many of them no longer had over a million. Meanwhile, the in-laws never lost a penny through all of the financial meltdown.

What is the safest form of keeping your money that gives some return but prevents you from losing to the market?

thunderkyss
08-23-2013, 05:29 PM
Haha ok TK. I forgot that if you have millions you must risk it in the stock market or it goes away. Thanks for the reminder.

Heck it takes quite a bit of time managing my measly pennies. I couldn't imagine being uber rich & mamaging it all myself.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 4

2012Champs
08-23-2013, 05:56 PM
Please explain. If I deposit a million dollars into an account insured by FDIC, it will be less than a million in the future? Even if I don't withdraw any of it?

All I know is that my in-laws are very conservative with their money. All their friends were multi-millionaires, but after the crash a few years ago, many of them no longer had over a million. Meanwhile, the in-laws never lost a penny through all of the financial meltdown.

What is the safest form of keeping your money that gives some return but prevents you from losing to the market?



Think lowest possible stated returns if you are looking for the least amount of risk. Short term US govt debt and CDs.

Those low risk products do not outperform inflation over time and this your purchasing power erodes, real rate of returns will post a loss so even though you dont see the losses you lost. If your folks' friends held on to their portfolios without changing they would have made all their money back and then some, even more if they reinvested dividends.

2012Champs
08-23-2013, 05:58 PM
Haha ok TK. I forgot that if you have millions you must risk it in the stock market or it goes away. Thanks for the reminder.

If you have millions in which you don't have any current need for or in the next few years some of those funds should be invested in the market most likely

Playoffs
08-23-2013, 05:59 PM
All their friends were multi-millionaires, but after the crash a few years ago, many of them no longer had over a million...

Why?

The market as measured by the S&P 500 is near its all time highs? (chart is ~45 days outdated, quickest I could find)

http://www.economicgreenfield.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/EconomicGreenfield.com-7-9-13-SPX-Monthly-LOG-since-1980.png

2012Champs
08-23-2013, 06:05 PM
Why?

The market as measured by the S&P 500 is near its all time highs? (chart is ~45 days outdated, quickest I could find)

http://www.economicgreenfield.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/EconomicGreenfield.com-7-9-13-SPX-Monthly-LOG-since-1980.png



People often have more invested in the market than they are really comfortable taking losses on. When the market keeps moving up people overreach same in the housing market. Then when the market turns they can't stand the pain a d typically change their asset allocation to a less risky portfolio after taking large losses. Well then the market climbs back and guess what? You don't gain nearly as much because you shifted to less risky assets. Then you feel you are missing out and shift back after the market has gone up and take on more risk, setting yourself up for more losses.

eriadoc
08-23-2013, 06:20 PM
Please explain. If I deposit a million dollars into an account insured by FDIC, it will be less than a million in the future? Even if I don't withdraw any of it?

Well, yeah. Inflation alone will make it worth less. A million today is not the same as a million 20 years ago, or 40 years ago, etc. I know you already know that, just pointing it out to keep this topic in perspective.

What is the safest form of keeping your money that gives some return but prevents you from losing to the market?

Diversification, but at least part of that diversification should be in commodities. Whether that means precious metals, real estate, chickens, widgets, or guns is just a minor detail. One of my friends has zero money in the stock market. He's never trusted it. He has various commodities, one of which is a plane. His net worth has risen over the same time period that you're noting people's decline in worth.

Furthermore, the stock market is no longer really an investment vehicle. It's a casino. The big firms play games with your money, manipulate the markets, collude in back rooms with shady deals, and rake in huge profits. If you bet right, you can be a part of that. But you have to get to know their game, and it's a lot more lucky than good when it comers to small potatoes individual investors.

Finally, can we all please put to rest the FDIC myth? It's a complete sham. The government doesn't have the money to reimburse investors up to $250K in a systemic failure, and if such a thing happened, they'd just print the money anyway. So congrats, the $250K you just got from FDIC (months after the crash, BTW) will now buy you a tank full of gas.

2012Champs
08-23-2013, 06:30 PM
Well, yeah. Inflation alone will make it worth less. A million today is not the same as a million 20 years ago, or 40 years ago, etc. I know you already know that, just pointing it out to keep this topic in perspective.



Diversification, but at least part of that diversification should be in commodities. Whether that means precious metals, real estate, chickens, widgets, or guns is just a minor detail. One of my friends has zero money in the stock market. He's never trusted it. He has various commodities, one of which is a plane. His net worth has risen over the same time period that you're noting people's decline in worth.

Furthermore, the stock market is no longer really an investment vehicle. It's a casino. The big firms play games with your money, manipulate the markets, collude in back rooms with shady deals, and rake in huge profits. If you bet right, you can be a part of that. But you have to get to know their game, and it's a lot more lucky than good when it comers to small potatoes individual investors.

Finally, can we all please put to rest the FDIC myth? It's a complete sham. The government doesn't have the money to reimburse investors up to $250K in a systemic failure, and if such a thing happened, they'd just print the money anyway. So congrats, the $250K you just got from FDIC (months after the crash, BTW) will now buy you a tank full of gas.


It's really hard to pick the right stocks yet just picking the s&p 500 is not really that complicated. It certainly is more complicated investing in individual commodities and I'm not sure anyone includes airplanes as a commodity or an investment as they are typically a losing prop as well


Secondly it's clear you don't understand the FDIC or its purpose. The FDIC is not in place to prevent or replace all bank fund during a systematic failure. That would be why the bailouts were created and executed. The FDIC is an insurance program and like any insurance program if everyone attempted to cash in on their policy value said company would fail

StarStruck
08-23-2013, 07:32 PM
FDIC is ok for standard banking practices up to $250,000, but that wouldn't work too well for someone who is a multimillionaire having to place $250K here, there, and everywhere all over the country. I'm sad to see how saving in the various banking options that once could easily gain 6 or more percent interest is now down to about 1 which has discouraged many from banking practices of yesteryear.

My math isn't too good, and it appears to me if someone is getting 1 to 2 percent interest on a CD and inflation is 6 percent then the money is working against them instead of for them.

2012Champs
08-23-2013, 08:13 PM
FDIC is ok for standard banking practices up to $250,000, but that wouldn't work too well for someone who is a multimillionaire having to place $250K here, there, and everywhere all over the country. I'm sad to see how saving in the various banking options that once could easily gain 6 or more percent interest is now down to about 1 which has discouraged many from banking practices of yesteryear.

My math isn't too good, and it appears to me if someone is getting 1 to 2 percent interest on a CD and inflation is 6 percent then the money is working against them instead of for them.


FDIC insurance isnt limited to 250k per person there are varying rules but also a person with a million or two typically isn't sitting all in cash.

Each ownership category of a depositor's money is insured separately up to the insurance limit, and separately at each bank. Thus a depositor with $250,000 in each of three ownership categories at each of two banks would have six different insurance limits of $250,000, for total insurance coverage of 6 × $250,000 = $1,500,000.[5] The distinct ownership categories are[5]

Single accounts (accounts not falling into any other category)
Certain retirement accounts (including Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs))
Joint accounts (accounts with more than one owner with equal rights to withdraw)
Revocable trust accounts (containing the words "Payable on death", "In trust for", etc.)
Irrevocable trust accounts
Employee Benefit Plan accounts (deposits of a pension plan)
Corporation/Partnership/Unincorporated Association accounts
Government accounts
All amounts that a particular depositor has in accounts in any particular ownership category at a particular bank are added together and are insured up to $250,000.


When you were earning 6% on money market/bank deposit rates you were paying a multiple of that for mortgage rates. It's all a matter of prospective

2012Champs
08-24-2013, 04:01 PM
At the end of the day

it's your choice as to whether or not you go with the suggested advice
or you go a different rout! and Owens being a grown man and being fully
capable of making his own decisions

took the advice,

that is not the fault of his former agent that is the fault of T.O. himself




Well the rules surrounding the financial industry aren't that cut and dry. If his financial advisor recommended that he place over 85% of his net worth into four illiquid names that is a problem for both however the advisor and his employer have liability if the recommendations are deemed unsuitable, which they were

thunderkyss
08-24-2013, 07:17 PM
Well the rules surrounding the financial industry aren't that cut and dry. If his financial advisor recommended that he place over 85% of his net worth into four illiquid names that is a problem for both however the advisor and his employer have liability if the recommendations are deemed unsuitable, which they were

Well, their liability is to disclose the risk. If they were on the up & up about the investment & there is no conflict of interest, you can't sue your adviser for making bad choices.

In this case, we're talking about suing the man who recommended the man who made bad investment choices. Unless Rosenhouse is in bed with T.O.s financial adviser I don't understand the nature of this suit.

2012Champs
08-25-2013, 12:41 AM
Well, their liability is to disclose the risk. If they were on the up & up about the investment & there is no conflict of interest, you can't sue your adviser for making bad choices.

In this case, we're talking about suing the man who recommended the man who made bad investment choices. Unless Rosenhouse is in bed with T.O.s financial adviser I don't understand the nature of this suit.



You are incorrect on both sides. The liability does not end at disclosing risk and you can be sure that part of the suit surely alleges that TO agent gained financial benefit from said advisor and I would think that TO's agent should have looked into a guy who had so many complaints filed against him before recommending his client put their money with him

mattieuk
08-25-2013, 02:00 AM
It's sad to see this problem with TO - as it is with many other young men across sporting professions who end up bankrupt shortly after they retire from the game, and have no tangible skills to create their second career.

I've thought for a long time that there needs to be a garnishing of top level professional athletes salaries, which is put in trust, until say 35 years old, and then released to them (or due to the probably legality of that - some sort of pension setup with players unions). It's sad to see the amount of young men, who come into absurd amounts of money at 18-21 years old, and often don't learn the value of money until they've spent/been duped out of it all, and have no easy was to pave a life out for themselves.

chicagotexan2
08-25-2013, 12:47 PM
It's sad to see this problem with TO - as it is with many other young men across sporting professions who end up bankrupt shortly after they retire from the game, and have no tangible skills to create their second career.

I've thought for a long time that there needs to be a garnishing of top level professional athletes salaries, which is put in trust, until say 35 years old, and then released to them (or due to the probably legality of that - some sort of pension setup with players unions). It's sad to see the amount of young men, who come into absurd amounts of money at 18-21 years old, and often don't learn the value of money until they've spent/been duped out of it all, and have no easy was to pave a life out for themselves.

The problem is these guys don't think big picture. Making that kind of money is temporary and they fail to grasp that. Couple that with ignorance wether it's by investing in questionable deals or questionable financial advisors and the ending is no real mystery. I don't know what former player said it but he pretty much summed it up by saying 'you can live like a king for 5 years or live like a prince for the rest of your life'. Toned down modest lifestyles don't register with some people so putting money away for a rainy day or living on a generous fixed income is not in the cards. TO should have done his homework when it came to investing his own money.

2012Champs
08-25-2013, 01:32 PM
This actually breaks down into two basic problems. 1. The average person's inability to manage their personal finances and 2. A financial advisor who was only out to make money for themselves


To the first point the reason why we focus on TO and other stars is because their downfall is so public and the frequency is also pretty high. I do believe if I gave teens and 20 something's 10-15 million dollars most of those would be broke within 5-10 years. Add fame to the picture and I think it just gets worse. It happens all the time to those who win the lottery, get a large inheritance, take over assets that where held in a custodial account ugma/utma. People by and large are stupid with their money and any large influx usually goes just as fast as it came in.

To the second point I think those who commit financial related crimes should spend a hell of a lot more time behind bars

Playoffs
08-25-2013, 02:20 PM
People often have more invested in the market than...

The question was to make a point. I understand the dynamics, and trade the markets every day.

2012Champs
08-26-2013, 09:09 AM
The question was to make a point. I understand the dynamics, and trade the markets every day.



If you trade everyday then the normal mindset of the avg investor doesnt apply to you

Double Barrel
08-26-2013, 11:40 AM
Sticking with FDIC insured products equals a guaranteed loss over time.

I kinda' figured it was about inflation.

But, that's my point. How much money does a person need to live a good life?

At the end of the day, T.O.'s money could have set him up for life even if he took the safest route and just kept his money in the bank.

Yeah, his $20 million might not have the same buying power 10 years from now, but I feel it's safe to say that he would still be very well off in a decade in spite of the loss of value.

2012Champs
08-26-2013, 11:42 AM
I kinda' figured it was about inflation.

But, that's my point. How much money does a person need to live a good life?

At the end of the day, T.O.'s money could have set him up for life even if he took the safest route and just kept his money in the bank.

Yeah, his $20 million might not have the same buying power 10 years from now, but I feel it's safe to say that he would still be very well off in a decade in spite of the loss of value.



Thats a very good point. If I were to win 40 million in the lottery I would have no real need to take chances making more. Its more the average person who needs their money to grow so they can retire. Good point

Texecutioner
08-26-2013, 12:08 PM
I think that a lot of people are forgetting the fact that this is TO. A guy who has historically blamed all of his problems in his life on other people and pushed dozens of people away that have been in his corner including Rosenhous at one point. TO made Rosenhous look like a complete ass many of times and he was one of the worst clients that any agent could have had to deal with. TO is doing what he has always done which is to try and point the finger at other sources when things don't go his way. It sucks that there are banks and advisors that take advantage of athletes with a lot of money who don't act responsible for their income, but I'm tired of hearing about these stories and hearing people make excuses for them.

Sorry, but these are good problems to have for the average American. TO and every other athlete is responsible for how they invest or safeguard their money the same way that I am. Hell, these guys don't even have to work for a strong portion of the year. They've got a lot more time on their hands then most of us do to learn and educate themselves on how to protect their money. Sure, anyone can get screwed out of their money by bad bankers and financial advisors, but this sure does happen way to often with athletes where they are simply just negligent when it comes to monitoring their financial portfolio.

2012Champs
08-26-2013, 01:41 PM
His financial adviser doesn't hold a crystal ball as to what
investments are gonna do and not do?

so Owens invested his money into a stock he thought would
make him money. Yes on the advise of his adviser and just
like a night at the casino he gambled and he lost

That is the risk you took, when nobody was holding a gun
to his head and saying do it!!

Owens should have known better



Ive worked in the industry long enough to understand how it works and what an advisor's duties are when it comes to making recommendations. I also have worked on enough complaints/arbitrations and settlements to know you are absolutley incorrect. Here is just a small portion of the pie that you are unaware of


Suitability
When your broker recommends that you buy or sell a particular security, your broker must have a reasonable basis for believing that the recommendation is suitable for you. In making this assessment, your broker must consider your income and net worth, investment objectives, risk tolerance, and other security holdings.

The major securities industry self-regulatory organizations have suitability rules. You'll find FINRA's suitability rule and links to other FINRA materials concerning suitability in the FINRA Manual on FINRA’s website. If you believe your broker made unsuitable recommendations or engaged in another sales practice abuse, please send us your complaint using our online complaint form.

thunderkyss
08-26-2013, 01:41 PM
Thats a very good point. If I were to win 40 million in the lottery I would have no real need to take chances making more. Its more the average person who needs their money to grow so they can retire. Good point

You also have to consider the lifestyle he wants to live. His Million dollar house probably had thousand dollar utility bills, the maintenance on those Lambos & what nots aren't cheap.

You & I could probably live off $40M for the rest of our lives, but T.O. was probably burning through a few million a year.

2012Champs
08-26-2013, 01:44 PM
You also have to consider the lifestyle he wants to live. His Million dollar house probably had thousand dollar utility bills, the maintenance on those Lambos & what nots aren't cheap.

You & I could probably live off $40M for the rest of our lives, but T.O. was probably burning through a few million a year.



My retirement target is 10 million so if I got 40 I surely would be ahead of my goal. I sure wish I had the talent to collect one of those checks

StarStruck
08-26-2013, 02:47 PM
My retirement target is 10 million so if I got 40 I surely would be ahead of my goal. I sure wish I had the talent to collect one of those checks

OBTW, thank you for sharing your insight on financial planning, etc. It is greatly appreciated.

2012Champs
08-26-2013, 02:49 PM
OBTW, thank you for sharing your insight on financial planning, etc. It is greatly appreciated.



No problem I enjoy it. I try to get more people engaged but most dont want to look at it. I can tell you how many friends, family and coworkers I have that have money issues but wont sit down to write out a budget