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View Full Version : Broncos C Dan Koppen tore his ACL


Playoffs
07-28-2013, 04:00 PM
Adam Schefter ‏@AdamSchefter
Tests confirmed Broncos C Dan Koppen tore his ACL, as @Jeff_Legwold reported.

Broncos still examining C Dan Koppen but he heard a pop in his knee, which never is a good sign, per source.

On it goes: Broncos C Dan Koppen carted off practice field Sunday with lower leg injury.

CloakNNNdagger
07-28-2013, 04:21 PM
Adam Schefter ‏@AdamSchefter

Peyton should be sceered............very sceered..............:roast:

jaayteetx
07-28-2013, 04:22 PM
Man, I hate hearing about injuries this time of year, makes me very nervous...

Lucky
07-28-2013, 04:35 PM
Koppen got the job in 2012 when JD Walton went down for the year with a broken ankle. Walton had surgery on the ankle again in June, so the Broncos are razor thin at center.

It's spooky seeing this many season ending injuries in the first few days of camp.

Playoffs
07-28-2013, 04:57 PM
Remember how important Jeff Saturday was to Peyton in Indy...

Lucky
07-28-2013, 05:02 PM
Remember how important Jeff Saturday was to Peyton in Indy...
I would love to see a 38 year old Saturday attempt to block Watt or Smith in a playoff game. :swatter:

CloakNNNdagger
07-28-2013, 05:16 PM
Koppen got the job in 2012 when JD Walton went down for the year with a broken ankle. Walton had surgery on the ankle again in June, so the Broncos are razor thin at center.

It's spooky seeing this many season ending injuries in the first few days of camp.

With first contact practices being ~7-8 months following their last for most players, makes me believe that players may be taking their conditioning for their more pussified non-contact mini-camps and OTAs less seriously .....and may be held by coaches and trainers to lesser standards to come down to the lower requirements than necessary for the old full-padded contact off season activities.

Lucky
07-28-2013, 05:21 PM
With first contact practices being ~7-8 months following their last for most players, makes me believe that players may be taking their conditioning for their more pussified non-contact mini-camps and OTAs less seriously .....
I guess. But I don't remember seeing so many training camp injuries back in the 70's & 80's, before the mini camp/OTA era. I think it's just as possible that these guys are over trained in the gym, with the joints just not being able to handle the forces created by the extra mass they are carrying. And they are getting bigger every year.

robroy72
07-28-2013, 07:22 PM
Broncos just signed Steve Vallos

CloakNNNdagger
07-28-2013, 07:27 PM
I guess. But I don't remember seeing so many training camp injuries back in the 70's & 80's, before the mini camp/OTA era. I think it's just as possible that these guys are over trained in the gym, with the joints just not being able to handle the forces created by the extra mass they are carrying. And they are getting bigger every year.

This is just another reason to get used to a more resistant target contact training. I had the opportunity to take care and befriend a number of Houston Oilers. I remember them talking about the fact that they HAD to stay in shape year around just to stay up with TC. They knew what to expect. TCs in those days were described as the worst weeks of their lives...........sometimes ALL day and there were NO DAYS OFF. Keep in mind that there were essentially no climate controlled fields except the Astrodome. (The Oilers had the Astrodome, but they were never allowed to practice in them for TC.) Specifically many teams were made to practice in the mid day sun/heat.......no shade allowed. Outdoor practices were never called off for rain or snow. And what they emphasized was that there were no multi-million dollar guaranteed contracts. If you weren't prepared for TC............you didn't have a job!.........and that included ALL of what would today be considered the "prima donna" vets.

Playoffs
07-29-2013, 11:10 AM
Lance Zierlein ‏@LanceZierlein
Denver will get better run blocking from Manny Ramirez than from Koppen and I'm sure Ramirez won't be asked to make any line calls.

The loss of Dan Koppen will hurt Denver from a communication and pass protection standpoint, but Manning's intelligence mitigates the loss

mootini
07-29-2013, 11:20 AM
Totally agree! Manning has never had a non Pro Bowl Center! Might be a ruff season for Manning.


Peyton should be sceered............very sceered..............:roast:

HOU-TEX
07-29-2013, 03:46 PM
It's unfortunate there's been this many serious injuries so far this year. I don't like seeing players go down any time, but to be lost for the year during camp must be deflating to the guys hurt.

Playoffs
07-31-2013, 04:26 PM
Adam Schefter ‏@AdamSchefter
For now, Broncos believe CB Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie suffered a high ankle sprain during practice today.

Playoffs
07-31-2013, 08:32 PM
Adam Schefter ‏@AdamSchefter
Broncos announced they agreed to terms with free-agent center Ryan Lilja. Out of retirement.

CloakNNNdagger
07-31-2013, 09:05 PM
Adam Schefter ‏@AdamSchefter

Peyton and the Broncs are getting desparate..............Wasn't he a GUARD?

infantrycak
07-31-2013, 09:07 PM
Peyton and the Broncs are getting desparate..............Wasn't he a GUARD?

For all but the last year of his career and that was due to injury.

CloakNNNdagger
07-31-2013, 09:40 PM
For all but the last year of his career and that was due to injury.

He had both knee and toe surgery this past April. There are very few toe injuries that require surgery......the first one you think of when you are talking about a big lineman is turf toe surgery (completely torn capsule). Players like this could take anywhere from 6-12 months to push off effectively. Two joints worked upon at the same time makes you wonder how far off the next one goes. I wouldn't get too excited yet if I were Peyton.

Playoffs
07-31-2013, 09:44 PM
Peyton and the Broncs are getting desparate..............Wasn't he a GUARD?
Yes, but he's played well at both positions. Pretty good option if he holds up, which he did last season.

BullBlitz
07-31-2013, 10:13 PM
I would love to see a 38 year old Saturday attempt to block Watt or Smith in a playoff game. :swatter:

Same here.

CloakNNNdagger
07-31-2013, 10:19 PM
Yes, but he's played well at both positions. Pretty good option if he holds up, which he did last season.

He "held up." I know he had a pretty poor year in 2011. Didn't see him much last year.

Brisco_County
08-01-2013, 12:41 AM
I've always wondered: Is there a way to detect a compromised or at-risk ligament? And if so, would it be possible to rehab it back to 100%?

CloakNNNdagger
08-01-2013, 09:38 AM
I've always wondered: Is there a way to detect a compromised or at-risk ligament? And if so, would it be possible to rehab it back to 100%?

Sorry, BC, but your question is monumentally too general............knee, hip, back, ankle, neck. The first step will always be for the player, coach, trainer and / or physician to recognize "pain," "tenderness," "swelling," and / or "instability" of a joint. Then have it distinguished from muscular or tendon being the source. Then the trick is to evaluate by imaging (x-rays, MRI, etc)) the area early in the process if it tends to persist or progress.....while being mindful that if rehab while still playing doesn't appear to be effective, most ligamentous damage requires rest to varying degrees. Unfortunately, this entire chain tends to break down when any one of these elements is ignored, delayed or misapplied. Finally, a ligament that has previously been injured and "healed" is one that tends to be at risk for re-injury in the future. This is because ligaments have notoriously lesser blood supply compared to tendon and muscle, and therefore more unpredictable in their ultimate "healing ability."

CloakNNNdagger
08-01-2013, 09:56 AM
I've always wondered: Is there a way to detect a compromised or at-risk ligament? And if so, would it be possible to rehab it back to 100%?

Sorry, BC, but your question is monumentally too general............knee, hip, back, ankle, neck. The first step will always be for the player, coach, trainer and / or physician to recognize "pain," "tenderness," "swelling," and / or "instability" of a joint. Then have it distinguished from muscular or tendon being the source. Then the trick is to evaluate by imaging (x-rays, MRI, etc)) the area early in the process if it tends to persist or progress.....while being mindful that if rehab while still playing doesn't appear to be effective, most ligamentous damage requires rest to varying degrees. Unfortunately, this entire chain tends to break down when any one of these elements is ignored, delayed or misapplied. It is important to understand that ligaments have significant lesser blood supply than muscle and tendon tissue, and therefor they have greater unpredictablity as to their ultimate "healing ability" and strength. That is why a ligament that has previously been injured is always at increased risk for future injury, especially without the proper time alotted for rest and rehab.

CloakNNNdagger
08-07-2013, 02:02 PM
It's spooky seeing this many season ending injuries in the first few days of camp.

Have you noticed how NFL players continue to drop like flies in TC.........despite the fact that all but 2 teams have yet to even play in one single preseason game?

Lucky
08-07-2013, 05:58 PM
Have you noticed how NFL players continue to drop like flies in TC.........despite the fact that all but 2 teams have yet to even play in one single preseason game?
And that's with the new rules limiting the number of practices in pads. Is there some correlation with that, I wonder?

CloakNNNdagger
08-07-2013, 06:23 PM
And that's with the new rules limiting the number of practices in pads. Is there some correlation with that, I wonder?

As I stated before, the pussified off season and TC have had the exact opposite expected effect on conditioning and preparedness, and ultimately on the ability for players' bodies to avoid injuries.

ChampionTexan
08-07-2013, 06:54 PM
As I stated before, the pussified off season and TC have had the exact opposite expected effect on conditioning and preparedness, and ultimately on the ability for players' bodies to avoid injuries.

I guess it depends on exactly what the expected effect was.
This argument that players have too much time off assumes that relatively short-term injuries are just as bad as the long-term injuries that the new offseason rules were designed to prevent.

They aren't.

The new rules were designed to limit the long-term health effects of football. It doesn't matter if some players are adversely effected in the short-term, the real problem is what's happening to NFL players years after they retire.

The leg injuries we've seen in training camp this year hurt the product on the field. The players will be fully healthy again in a year, and the biggest effect will be to the 2013 product.

LINK (http://www.businessinsider.com/rash-of-nfl-injuries-blamed-on-new-cba-rule-2013-8#ixzz2bKIOdSyS)

CloakNNNdagger
08-07-2013, 07:43 PM
I guess it depends on exactly what the expected effect was.


LINK (http://www.businessinsider.com/rash-of-nfl-injuries-blamed-on-new-cba-rule-2013-8#ixzz2bKIOdSyS)

This article distorts every aspect of the argument.

The long-term concussion history effects in many players will have begun in elementary school football, certainly by high school. It is felt that even if players only made it through college ball and stopped playing, the progression to long-term effects on the brain, if they were destined to occur, will have already been well-established.

Furthermore, as for attempting to minimize the effects of lower body injuries, talk to the post NFL players that have sustained significant football hip, knee or ankle injuries (which would encompass most players before their careers are over) when they were younger. You might be genuinely surprised how many have had major knee or hip or ankle reconstructive surgeries or replacements and/or wheel chairs waiting for them by the time they were 40-50. You might find that they may question their quality of life issues being less debilitating than the very much fewer players afflicted by significant brain effects such as CTE.

If you are going to take one side of the argument or the other, that's fine...........but not on the basis that lower body injuries are temporary or just for one season........and therefore should be a lesser factor in the overall equation when evaluating the entire injury problem.

ChampionTexan
08-07-2013, 10:14 PM
This article distorts every aspect of the argument.

The long-term concussion history effects in many players will have begun in elementary school football, certainly by high school. It is felt that even if players only made it through college ball and stopped playing, the progression to long-term effects on the brain, if they were destined to occur, will have already been well-established.

Furthermore, as for attempting to minimize the effects of lower body injuries, talk to the post NFL players that have sustained significant football hip, knee or ankle injuries (which would encompass most players before their careers are over) when they were younger. You might be genuinely surprised how many have had major knee or hip or ankle reconstructive surgeries or replacements and/or wheel chairs waiting for them by the time they were 40-50. You might find that they may question their quality of life issues being less debilitating than the very much fewer players afflicted by significant brain effects such as CTE.

If you are going to take one side of the argument or the other, that's fine...........but not on the basis that lower body injuries are temporary or just for one season........and therefore should be a lesser factor in the overall equation when evaluating the entire injury problem.

Admittedly, I don't know the science (and never claimed to), but I do know that the NFL isn't dealing with a class action lawsuit that was brought on behalf of over 4,000 former players relating to lower body injuries.

CloakNNNdagger
08-07-2013, 10:50 PM
Admittedly, I don't know the science (and never claimed to), but I do know that the NFL isn't dealing with a class action lawsuit that was brought on behalf of over 4,000 former players relating to lower body injuries.

The suit is mostly based on the allegations of NFL conspiracy and fraudulent concealment of information from players that there was a link between concussions and permanent brain damage. The 4,000 former players have a range of claims of anywhere from no established sequellae to minor findings such as headaches, depression and dementia (not uncommonly found in the general population), to the major CTE. Many are included demanding periodic monitoring for these conditions to see if they develop them in the future. There is a separate class action suit of greater magnitude that wishes to claim coverage /benefits/reimbursement for general medical problems which were not offered to former players.